Автор неизвестен - Mededworld and amee 2013 conference connect - страница 100

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Evaluation of a comprehensive admission procedure including MMI, MCQ and GPA in a large scale setting

Anne Lindebo Holm 0vrehus (University of Southern Denmark, Faculty of Health Sciences, Winsl0wparken 19.3, Odense M 5230, Denmark) Maria Cecilie Vonsild (University of Southern Denmark, Faculty of Health Sciences, Odense, Denmark) Karen Gersrtoem (University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark)

Maia Jensen (University of Aarhus, Denmark) Birgitta Wallstedt (University of Southern Denmark, Faculty of Health Sciences, Odense, Denmark)

Background: Admission to medical school is a competitive process with high stakes. Any admission process must therefore be valid and reliable. The University of Southern Denmark has since 2008 used a combination of Grade Point Average(GPA), the ACER (Australian Council of Educational Research) admission MCQ (uniTEST ™) and a 7-8 station Multiple Mini Interview(MMI) to admit 50% of students(ATP-S). The remainder of students are admitted on GPA alone (GPA-

S).

Summary of work: In this project we evaluate the admission procedure (GPA, MCQ, and MMI) from 2008­2010. 2267 applicants completed all or parts of the procedure resulting in 478 enrolled students. The reliability of the MMI and MCQ and their correlation with each other and the GPA is assessed. GPA-S is compared to ATP-S on dropout rates and study progress. Summary of results: The MCQ and the MMI had an average reliability of 0,87 and 0,58 respectively. The average correlation between MCQ/MMI, MCQ/GPA and GPA/MMI was 0,1086/0,2123/-0,0322 respectively. The ADT-S superseded the GPA-S in study progress ( 93% vs 88,3 % p=0,011 passing the year 1 exams;). Lower dropout rates (2,1 % vs 4,0 % p=0,09) were also noted. Conclusions: The ATP has proved valid in selecting students who perform well. The combined reliability of the MCQ and MMI is satisfactory and their low correlation with each other and the GPA suggests an additive value of each component. Take-home messages: Combination of GPA, a MCQ measuring different cognitive qualities and a MMI focusing on personal skills performs well in selecting students for medical school as judged by performance and retention.

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Can Multiple Mini-Interview predict academic achievement in medical school?

JeongHee Yang (Kangwon National University School of Medicine, Department of Family Medicine, 1

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Kangwondaehak-gil, Chuncheon, Gangwon-do 200-701, Korea, Republic of (South Korea))

Seok Hoon Kang (Kangwon National University School of Medicine, Department of Medical Education, Chuncheon, Korea, Republic of (South Korea)) Ja Kyung Kim (Kangwon National University School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Chuncheon, Korea, Republic of (South Korea))

Hee Jae Lee (Kangwon National University School of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology, Chuncheon, Korea, Republic of (South Korea)) Kyu-Hyoung Lim (Kangwon National University School of Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Chuncheon, Korea, Republic of (South Korea))

Background: MMI is known as the best predictor of objective structured clinical examination performance. But it isn't revealed that MMI could predict the academic achievement of the other subjects in medical school curriculum.

Summary of work: Since 2008 year Kangwon National University School of Medicine has developed MMI as an admission process. Three rooms evaluating respective domains: motivation to become a doctor, ethical decision-making, communication and interpersonal skills, were opened to 84 applicants at 2008 year. 49 applicants were selected as medical students and 46 students of them finished the full course of medical education within 4 year curriculum. We calculated the Pearson's correlation coefficients between the total score of MMI of 46 graduates and the academic achievements of them in all subjects of the curriculum. Summary of results: The Pearson's correlation coefficients between the total score of MMI and the academic achievements of 'Medical Interview and History Taking', 'Problem Based Learning', 'Doctoring 1' and 'Clinical Practice of Surgery' were in the range of 0.4~0.7 which meant moderately related. And those of between the total score of MMI and the academic achievements of 'Research Overview', 'Technical and Procedural Skills', 'Clinical Practice of Laboratory Medicine', 'Clinical Performance Examination 1,3', 'Psychiatry Practice', 'Neurology Practice', 'Orthopedics' and 'Anesthesiology' were in the range of 0.2~0.4 which meant weakly related.

Conclusions: The total score of MMI is more related to the academic achievements in the field of Medical Humanities or Clinical Practice than those in the field of Basic Medical Science and seems to be a good predictor of the success in such fields.

Take-home messages: MMI score at administration can predict medical students' academic achievement in the subjects related to Medical Humanities or Clinical Practice.

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Behavioral and ethical judgments in a video-based SJT for selecting medical students in Germany: Do they work in the same way?

Anja Bath (University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular

Cell Biology, Martinistrafie 52, Hamburg 20246, Germany)

Christian Kothe (University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Cell Biology, Hamburg, Germany) Wolfgang Hampe (University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Cell Biology, Hamburg, Germany)

Background: In Germany, there are many more applicants for medical schools than places. The selection process of medical students at Hamburg university includes the natural science test HAM-Nat and the Multiple-Mini Interview HAM-Int. To collect further information about social and personal characteristics we additionally tested a video-based situational judgment

test (SJT).

Summary of work: 192 participants of the HAM-Int 2012 watched 4 videos containing communication and decision-making situations. For each video 2-3 questions with an open answer format were given to the participants. Responses were evaluated by two independent raters using two different strategies: 1) behavioral judgments by counting whether specified behavioral units had been mentioned by the participants and 2) ethical judgments by rating the global quality of given answers. For validation purposes personal characteristics were measured by traditional personality inventories or application-oriented and specific personality questionnaires. Distribution and central tendency measures, rater agreement and the correlations to the validity instruments were analyzed. Summary of results: Ethical judgments had lower rater agreements (ICC=0.280) than behavioral judgments (ICC=0.866), smaller standard deviations of the responses and more extreme difficulties. Independently of rating SJT-tasks just weakly correlate with any personal characteristics.

Conclusions: Behavioral ratings are more reliable than ethical ratings in a video-based SJT. Raters are overstrained with global assessment of moral issues, actions or decisions stated in participants' answers. Criterion validity of our video-based SJT has to be further analyzed.

Take-home messages: The use of video-based SJTs in student selection needs specific and objective evaluation schemes.

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Faking influences scores in situational judgement test - myth or reality

Jaydeep Mandal (UHSM NHS Foundation Trust and University of Manchester, Acute Medicine, 5, Mulberry Court, Gaskell Road, Altrincham WA14 1TL, United Kingdom)

Background: Selection in medical education needs to have the same quality assurance processes as in the assessment during the course (Prideaux et al, 2011). Patterson et al (2012) evaluated Situational judgement test (SJT) as a selection method in medical education. A

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systematic review was conducted in order to evaluate the evidence behind whether 'faking' would influence the scores in SJT

Summary of work: An online search of multiple databases was carried out using predetermined search terms to obtain studies relevant to the topic. Summary of results: Peeters et al (2005) found significant effect of faking on the performance in SJT and negative impact of faking on criterion related and incremental validity of SJT. Peeters et al, (2005) opined that faking is possible in SJT depending on the instructions used - knowledge based instructions ("should do") were more resistant to faking than behaviour based instructions ("would do"). They also found evidence to suggest that faking in SJT was dependent on the construct measured. Conclusions: Faking is possible in the selection through SJT and it affects the predictive validity and inter-rater reliability of the results of SJT. However this is dependent on the type of response format used and further research is necessary whether faking can be used to augment or influence scores in medical education selection.

Take-home messages: We need to research why and under which conditions faking is possible in SJT and what is the effect of coaching (Peeters et al, 2005).

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Student selection in dentistry - The influence of dexterity and space on performance in preclinical laboratory courses

Christian Kothe (University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Cell Biology, Martinistrafie 52, Hamburg 20246, Germany

Anja Bath (University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Cell Biology, Hamburg, Germany) Wolfgang Hampe (University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Cell Biology, Hamburg, Germany)

Background: Current studies identify "space" as a proper predictor of performance in dental laboratory courses and disagree with earlier findings, which proved "dexterity" as a suitable selection criterion in dental admission. The relation of different abilities to dental skill acquisition and laboratory course performance in preclinical dentistry has not been fully clarified. Summary of work: Referring to Ackerman's theory of skill acquisition we postulated that "space" has a weak and "dexterity" a moderate influence on performance of consistent tasks with low complexity. Furthermore, we expected that both abilities have a moderate influence on performance of inconsistent tasks with high complexity. "Dexterity" was measured using our wire bending test HAM-Man and "space" with an LPS-subscale before admission. Laboratory course performance was graded from 1=insufficient to 6=very good.

Summary of results: Partial least squares regression analysis confirmed our hypotheses. "Dexterity" had a moderate (P=.519, p<0.001) and "space" a weak (P=-.080, n.s.) influence on performance in the first semester course (n=37). Both abilities showed a moderate influence on performance in the first phantom course (second year, n=30, Pdex=.370, Pspa=.362, p<0.001) and second (third year, n=28, Pdex=.423, Pspa=-.325, p<0.05), which contain more complex and inconsistent tasks. Conclusions: In line with Ackerman's theory we can explain the influence of "dexterity" and "space" on dental skill acquisition in preclinical laboratory courses. Complexity and consistency of tasks are essential to explain individual differences in performance. Take-home messages: "Space" and "dexterity" have a significant influence on performance in preclinical laboratory courses. Both abilities are appropriate selection criteria for student admission in dentistry.

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Approach to determine an admission policy and selection methods in medical universities in Kazakhstan

Alma Syzdykova (Ministry of Health, Research and Human Resources Department, Astana, Kazakhstan) Saltanat Yegeubayeva (Republican Center of Healthcare Development, Deputy Director, Astana, Kazakhstan) Vitaliy Koikov (Republican Center of Healthcare Development, Centre for Research, Expertise and Health Innovation Development, Astana, Kazakhstan) Farida Nurmanbetova (Republican Center of Healthcare Development, Centre for Research, Expertise and Health Innovation Development, Astana, Kazakhstan) Maral Kaliyeva (Republican Center of Healthcare Development, Centre for Research, Expertise and Health Innovation Development, Imanova str.13, Astana 010000, Kazakhstan)

Zaure Baigozhina (Republican Center of Healthcare Development, Centre for Research, Expertise and Health Innovation Development, Astana, Kazakhstan)

Background: Analysis of admission procedure in medical universities shows the existence of problematic issues to be addressed, at the level of pre-professional education - school graduates aren't well informed about future profession; at the admission stage - competition is carried out only on the basis of the Unique National Testing results excluding medical specifics; at the stage of applicants' selection - dropout rates from medical school is 10-12%.

Summary of work: International experience demonstrates the importance of candidates' characteristics multiple aspects assessment - academic and nonacademic skills and abilities. Students, interns and faculty survey was conducted in two pilot universities to determine health worker's professional values, including five major competencies as preparations to implement MMI for applicants' selection at medical universities. Each component importance was assessed by Likert scale.

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Summary of results: Analysis of research defined the following applicant's significant qualities: 1) personal -ability to express thoughts, observation, curiosity, patience, independence, maturity of judgments; 2) interpersonal and communicative skills - ability to consult, communicate, collegiality, confidentiality; 3) moral and ethical - call of duty, responsibility, honesty, integrity; 4) leadership - decision-making, confidence, stress resistance; 5) thinking - ability to learn, reasoning. Conclusions: Research results are pre-condition for effective design of selection and admission process to universities and will be used in preparing situational tasks and questions for MMI. Take-home messages: Selection and admission procedures to medical universities are important to achieve efficiency and quality of healthcare workforce training.

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Selection-interviews at Hannover Medical School: Does the educational level of the parents matter?

A Dudzinska (Hannover Medical School, Deanery of Student Affairs, Carl-Neuberg-Str. 1, Hannover 30167, Germany)

V Fischer (Hannover Medical School, Deanery of Student Affairs, Hannover, Germany)

Background: In Germany, universities - notably Medical Schools - traditionally there is a large proportion of students whose parents already gained a high educational level. Selection procedures, particularly when interviews are conducted, are suspected to put at a disadvantage those who have lower parental educational backgrounds. At Hannover Medical School 60% of applicants are admitted by selection-interviews combined with GPA. Prior to invitation, applicants are asked to complete a questionnaire regarding motivation, future occupational area and parental educational background. The interviews were implemented as an additional criterion for broadening the selection process. Therefore a bias favouring applicants with parental academic background would be a severe thread for the intended results.

Summary of work: We descriptively analysed two cohorts and compared applicants with parental academic background and parental non-academic background considering distribution at the beginning of selection-interviews, GPA, received scores in selection-interviews as well as the overall outcome. Summary of results: Expectedly, three quarters of the applicants have parents with academic background. There are no statistically significant differences between the groups regarding GPA as well as received scores in selection interviews. The ratio at the beginning of the selection-process corresponds to the outcome. Conclusions: Within the selection-interviews at Hannover Medical School applicants with non-academic-background regarding parental educational status aren't at a disadvantage. Further research shall analyse the parental background of our faculty staff and the

influence of parental educational background on the success within the courses.

Take-home messages: There's no disadvantage within selection-interviews at Hannover Medical School for applicants with non-academic-background regarding parental educational backgrounds.

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Correlation Between GPA and National Competence Examination (NACE) Results

Herman Kristanto (Faculty of Medicine, Diponegoro University Indonesia, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Jl. Lebdosari I No.1A, Jl. Dr. Sutomo No. 18, Semarang 50145, Indonesia)

Background: The aim of the study is to know whether there is any correlation between GPA and National Competence Examination (NACE) result. Summary of work: Medical education in Indonesia consists of Academic Stage and Profession Stage. The final step in the education is all students have to follow NACE as an exit exam. After computing the mean GPA of each stage and NACE result, we compute the correlation between GPA and NACE result using Pearson Correlation.

Summary of results: Mean of GPA at Academic Stage = 3.24, mean of GPA at Profession Stage = 3.46 and mean of NACE result = 76.82. There is a moderate significant correlation between GPA at Academic Stage and GPA at Profession Stage (r = 0.426, p <0.05) and also moderate correlation between GPA at Profession Stage and NACE result (r=0.480, p <0.05).

Conclusions: There is a moderate significant correlation between GPA and NACE result. Take-home messages: Student performance at Academic and Profession Stages has a correlation with

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Association between a Medical School Admission processes

Sun Jung Myung (Seoul National University College of Medicine, Office of Medical Education, Seoul, Korea, Republic of (South Korea))

Tae Yeon Kim (Seoul National University College of Medicine, Office of Medical Education, Seoul, Korea, Republic of (South Korea))

Bora Kim (Seoul National University College of Medicine, Office of Medical Education, Seoul, Korea, Republic of (South Korea))

Seok Hoon Kang, Kangwon National University College of Medicine, Department of Medical Education, Kangwon-Do, Republic of (South Korea)) (Presenter: Mee Joo Kang, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Korea, Republic of (South Korea))

Background: While many medical schools already incorporate data about non-academic characteristics into their admissions processes, these characteristics and assessing processes vary widely by school. This

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study examined the validity of each assessing tool in relation to a variety of outcome measures. Summary of work: This study used a longitudinal-cohort design to examine the validity of assessing tools for academic and non-academic competencies. All students who matriculated at Seoul National University School of Medicine between 2002 and 2008 were included. Outcome measures were grade point average (GPA) at the end of the 4-year Bachelor's degree period, GPA across the 4 years of the curriculum, GPA during internship and residency.

Summary of results: GPA across the 4 years of the curriculum was not significantly different according to the students' affiliated colleges or former major. Former GPA of affiliated college positively correlated with GPA at the end of the 4-year (r=0.2566, p<0.0001). However, the score of essay negatively correlated with them (r=-0.1294, p=0.048). The correlation between assessing tools are as follows; between essay and interview was r=-0.2679 (p<0.0001); between English score and GPA, r=0.2196 (p=0.001); and between English score and autobiographical submission, r=0.1722 (p=0.008). Regression analysis showed that former GPA of affiliated college and young age at the admission were good predictors of GPA across and at the end of the 4-year. Conclusions: These findings suggest that GPA was the most reliable predictor of student's performance. Essay and interview failed to select good performing students. For assessing non-academic competencies, future research is needed.

Take-home message: GPA was the most reliable predictor of student's performance.

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The prediction of successful completion in medical study

Cestmir Stuka (Charles University in Prague, First Faculty of Medicine, Katerinska 32, Prague 121 08, Czech Republic)

Patricia Martinkova (Institute of Computer Science, Academy of Sciences, Centre of Biomedical Informatics and Department of Medical Informatics and Biostatistics, Prague, Czech Republic)

Background: The study analyzes admission procedure at the largest school of medicine in the Czech Republic. Summary of work: Data of 383 students admitted in 1999 were analysed by use of Pearson's correlations between predictors, cluster analysis and logistic regression.

Summary of results: We show that preadmission grades (GPA) predict the overall success in medical study with the same accuracy as admission tests but each of them describe different dimension of students' abilities. Conclusions: The idea to admit part of the students only on base of excellent GPA can be considered a reasonable one. Nevertheless, simultaneous use of GPA and AT in admission process would bring higher quality of selection process and also practical advantages for future analyses.

Take-home messages: Admission tests and pre­admission grades were shown to describe different dimensions of students' abilities. While preadmission GPA describes long-term study success and ability to succeed in wide scale of high-school subjects, as the opposite, the admission tests cover students' ability to learn large amount of information, which might be crucial for future medical studies.

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The role of specific preparatory courses for entry to the Medical, Bio-medical and Health-care course degrees in Italy

Paolo Falaschi (Faculty of Medicine and Psychology, Sapienza University of Rome, Dept of Surgical and Medical Sciences and Translational Medicine, Sant'Andrea Hospital, Via di Grottarossa 1035, Rome 00189, Italy)

Fatima Longo (De Sanctis High School, Rome, Italy) Eleonora Fancetti (Faculty of Medicine and Psychology, Sapienza University of Rome, Dept of Surgical and Medical Sciences and Translational Medicine, Rome,

Italy)

Stefano Eleuteri (Faculty of Medicine and Psychology, Sapienza University of Rome, Dept of Surgical and Medical Sciences and Translational Medicine, Rome,

Italy)

Michela Relucenti (Faculty of Pharmacy and Medicine, Sapienza University of Rome, Dept of Anatomical, Histological Forensic and Orthopaedic Sciences, Rome,

Italy)

Giuseppe Familiari (Faculty of Pharmacy and Medicine, Sapienza University of Rome, Dept of Anatomical, Histological Forensic and Orthopaedic Sciences, Rome,

Italy)

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