Автор неизвестен - Mededworld and amee 2013 conference connect - страница 102

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Take-home messages: These results must be taken into account to implement remediation measures in the near future.

8CC/10

Use of the DREEM inventory to compare the students' perception of the educational environment in different curricular stages: from initial cycle to clinical cycle

Marcelo Garcia Dieguez (Universidad Nacional del Sur, Health Science, Tucuman 419, Bahia Blanca 8000, Argentina)

Alejandro Cragno (Universidad Nacional del Sur, Health

Science, Bahia Blanca, Argentina)

Marta del Valle (Universidad Nacional del Sur, Health

Science, Bahia Blanca, Argentina)

Marina Bolletta (Universidad Nacional del Sur, Health

Science, Bahia Blanca, Argentina)

Lucrecia Burgos (Universidad Nacional del Sur, Health

Science, Bahia Blanca, Argentina)

Corina Lamponi (Universidad Nacional del Sur, Health

Science, Bahia Blanca, Argentina)

Background: The learning environment perception could be modified by different factors, one of which is the organizational climate. Change in learning settings across the curriculum could lead to change in educational environment perception. Summary of work: To compare the perception of the educational environment of two cohorts of medical students from the Universidad Nacional del Sur (spiral integrated curriculum) at two different points in time: the initial cycle (problem-based learning) and the clinical cycle (practice-based learning). Subjects and methods: A prospective descriptive study. The DREEM questionnaire was applied to two cohorts of students when the they

were in the initial cycle (2nd and 3rd year) in 2009 and reassessed in 2011 while they were in the clinical cycle

(4th and 5th year).

Summary of results: From a total of 84 eligible students 76 were still active in 2011, 69 responded the survey and 53 (69,7%) were analyzed. The Cronbach alpha was 0,859 for 2009 data and 0,913 for 2011. Average overall score was for 2009 was 146,17 (DS±12,297) and for 2011

146,19 (DS±19,863) representing an educational environment that is more positive than negative. Total scores and subscale comparison across cycles shown no statistically significant differences except for Student Academic Perception with better perception in the clinical cycle (p=0,046.).

Conclusions: The overall perception of the students on the educational environment was very good; there were no statistically significant differences in total score across cycles probably because other factors have greater influence than learning scenarios. Take-home messages: Our study suggests the utility of continuous assessment of the educational environment.

8DD Posters: Subjects in the Curriculum

Location: South Hall, PCC 8DD/1

Filling the gap - teaching on interpersonal violence in the undergraduate medical curriculum

Catherine White (Central Manchester University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, St Marys Sexual Assault Referral Centre, Manchester, United Kingdom) Zainab Jawad (The University of Manchester, School of Medicine, Stopford Building, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PT, United Kingdom

Lucy Williams (The University of Manchester, School of Medicine, Manchester, United Kingdom) Jessica Roth (The University of Manchester, School of Medicine, Manchester, United Kingdom)

Background: 'Interpersonal violence' is a term that encompasses sexual assault, rape, elder abuse and domestic abuse. All doctors, regardless of specialty, will come into contact with patients who may have an abusive history - either acute or historical. However, most UK medical schools provide little or no teaching on the issues surrounding interpersonal violence. It is often assumed that there is 'no room' to fit in additional teaching in medical school timetables. But advancements in medical education mean that teaching no longer needs to take the form of formal lecture or didactic teaching sessions. An educational package was developed that aimed to equip medical students with an understanding of these topics. Summary of work: A questionnaire was developed to gauge the base level of medical student knowledge. Teaching materials for clinical medical students were also designed - video lectures were recorded, discussion cases were added to the e-learning curriculum and resources were made available for further learning. Summary of results: Early feedback from students is overwhelmingly positive. Many indicated that it will influence their future clinical practice, and has served to dispel myths and stereotypes that they had previously held. Students particularly appreciated that teaching was provided via e-learning.

Conclusions: Teaching on interpersonal violence is an important addition to undergraduate curricula and is valued by students.

Take-home messages: In busy medical curricula, it is often hard to find space for additional teaching on 'new' topics. However, teaching can be successfully provided in a variety of ways, so that important topics can be covered concisely and effectively.

8DD/2

An undergraduate multidisciplinary conference to stimulate interest in wilderness medicine and global health

K McGregor (University of Manchester, School of Medicine, Stopford Building, Oxford Road, Manchester

M13 9PT, United Kingdom)

ABSTRACT BOOK: SESSION 8 TUESDAY 27 AUGUST: 1400-1530

Background: The traditional curriculum in medical schools in the UK often does not cover the specialist and diverse field of wilderness medicine 'emergency medicine practiced in a remote environment' or global health. There is often limited opportunity to learn from, or alongside, other healthcare disciplines who may also work in this field.

Summary of work: An undergraduate multidisciplinary weekend conference organised by medical students was advertised to medical, nursing and paramedical students across the UK. A mixture of short workshops and longer 'hands-on' activities were presented by specialist ambulance crews and experts in mountain rescue, humanitarian aid, military medicine and many more areas. This enabled students to discover alternative careers within their discipline, learn about other disciplines' roles and gain specialist knowledge and skills. Feedback in the form of rating and free text was collected from delegates after the event. Summary of results: Delegates (n=204) attended the conference where 32 organisations ran workshops and activities. Quantitative data collected from students rated the conference overall a mean score of 9/10. Qualitative data revealed students were inspired by the speakers, discovered more about their potential career, enjoyed the variety of activities and workshops on offer and were able to socialise with other like-minded students.

Conclusions: The conference inspired students to further develop their interest in wilderness medicine through learning useful skills and knowledge, appreciating the roles of different disciplines and networking with students and speakers. Take-home messages: Undergraduate conferences in specialist areas offer students the opportunity to learn more about their potential career, whilst gaining knowledge and skills.

8DD/3

Behavioural Management in Dentistry - A Curricular Design

Muhammad Humza Bin Saeed (Islamic International Dental College, Riphah International University, Community Dentistry, 7th Avenue, G-7/4, Islamabad 44000, Pakistan)

Yawar Hayat Khan (Islamic International Dental College,

Riphah International University, Dental Materials

Department, Islamabad, Pakistan)

Arsalan Yahya (Islamic International Dental College,

Riphah International University, Dentistry, Islamabad,

Pakistan)

Background: Dental anxiety has been identified as one of the two most crucial barriers encountered by the general population in accessing dental health care. Dentists have been reported to use a number of behavioural management techniques to manage dental anxiety which may be either learnt during undergraduate or graduate training, or by observing other dentists, or by trial or error. Several of these

techniques have been validated as being effective in relieving dental anxiety. It has been suggested that a course in behavioural management should be incorporated into the curriculum of dental schools. Summary of work: The dental undergraduate curriculum needs to be revised in the light of current evidence such that behavioural management in incorporated within the current dental curriculum Summary of results: We, at Islamic International Dental College have designed an evidence based 'Behavioural management module' to be incorporated into the undergraduate dental curriculum. Conclusions: Behavioural management skills are integral in the management of the dental patient. Dentists must be trained to manage the dentally anxious patient. To achieve this, a course designed in the light the current best evidence has been designed. Take-home messages: Incorporation of the module will equip the dental students to manage dentally anxious students more confidently and appropriately, with less use of pharmacological interventions.

8DD/4

Proportion of 4th-6th year medical students who had a good level of knowledge about infection control: a study in a medical school

Naesinee Chaiear (Faculty of Medicine, Khon Kaen

University, Community Medicine, 123 Mitrapharb Road,

Muang, Khon Kaen 40002, Thailand)

Nataphon Wuthithepbuncha (Faculty of Medicine, Khon

Kaen University, Community Medicine, Khon Kaen,

Thailand)

Napat Laoaroon (Faculty of Medicine, Khon Kaen University, Community Medicine, Khon Kaen, Thailand) Kiatnarin Chuesiriphat (Faculty of Medicine, Khon Kaen University, Community Medicine, Khon Kaen, Thailand) Kanittha Waree (Faculty of Medicine, Khon Kaen University, Community Medicine, Khon Kaen, Thailand) Chowwalit Sombonterdtana (Faculty of Medicine, Khon Kaen University, Community Medicine, Khon Kaen, Thailand)

Background: Nosocomial infection is a critical medical problem which results in many losses so infection control is used to solve it. Healthcare workers including medical students should have this knowledge to decrease nosocomial infection. Summary of work: To determine 1) the proportion of 4th-6th year medical students who had a good level of knowledge about infection control; 2) the proportion of their compliance according to infection control procedure; 3) Attitude of 4th-6th year medical students about improving an infection control teaching program. A Descriptive study using a self-administered questionnaire containing a standard precaution and transmission-based precaution, ventilator-associated pneumonia, catheter-related urinary tract infection, blood stream infection and surgical site infection. Summary of results: The overall response rate was 79.9% (361/452). The proportion of 4th-6th year medical students with a good level of knowledge about

ABSTRACT BOOK: SESSION 8 TUESDAY 27 AUGUST: 1400-1530

infection control was 3.7% (13/347) (95%CI:2.2,6.2); The highest knowledge level was regarding respiratory tract (57.9 %) followed by standard precaution (25.3%) and the least well understood area was surgical site infection (1.7%). For compliance, the greatest compliance was using 70% Alcohol to clean the puncture site before and after drawing urine from Foley's catheter (44.6%) and the lowest compliance was bringing unnecessary equipment into the operating room (8.6%). Medical students need to increase infection control in the medical curriculum; to a high level for 50.3% and practical-base education for 57.2%. Conclusions: Of 4th-6th year medical students, only 3.7 % had a good level of knowledge about infection control. The lowest part which had a good level of knowledge about infection control was surgical site infection prevention while the lowest level of compliance was bringing unnecessary equipment such as books into operating room.

Take-home messages: Medical students must learn and practice infection control in their daily practice throughout their medical profession.

8DD/5

Learning Ophthalmology through integrated approach by Medical Students at Medical University in United Arab Emirates

Pankaj Lamba (Gulf Medical University Hospital and Research Centre, Ophthalmology, Post Box 4184, Ajman, United Arab Emirates)

Manda Venkatramana (Gulf Medical University, Surgery, Ajman, United Arab Emirates)

Background: Teaching and learning of medical students in Ophthalmology is varied among medical schools across the globe. International guidelines of basic learning outcomes in ophthalmology are available. Our University shifted from a traditional to organ system based integrated curriculum in 2008. Learning Ophthalmology through an integrated approach spread across various organ system modules presents challenges. This work describes how the ophthalmology curriculum was delivered in the integrated medical curriculum.

Summary of work: The terminal competencies required of a medical graduate in ophthalmology were defined. The knowledge, skill and attitudinal objectives were derived from these terminal competencies. The knowledge domain was integrated and distributed among various organ system and multisystem modules like Diabetes and Hypertension spread across four years. The ophthalmology clinical skills were integrated amongst disciplines and distributed during the clinical skill component of organ system modules and clinical clerkship postings. The attitudinal skills were learnt throughout the medical course. The students were assessed in an integrated examination at the end of the year examination

Summary of results: 60 students learnt ophthalmology through horizontally and vertically integrated modules of nervous, cardiovascular, endocrine, multi-system

modules and clinical clerkship postings spanned over 4 years.

Conclusions: Ophthalmology can be learnt by medical students in an integrated method and the curriculum can be distributed across various organ systems model in an integrated curriculum. Take-home messages: It is essential for a medical graduate to learn basic ophthalmology to provide basic and preventive eye care to the patients. Ophthalmology can be learnt in an integrated curriculum following organ system method using competency based method.

8DD/6

Making haematology relevant to the undergraduate medical student: A practical interactive course

M Wang (King's College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Haematology, Denmark Hill, London SE5 9RS, United Kingdom)

N Igbineweka (King's College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London, United Kingdom)

R. K. Mukherjee (King's College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London, United Kingdom) P. F. M. Robinson (King's College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London, United Kingdom)

Background: Medical students often perceive haematology as a daunting 'niche' specialty removed from everyday clinical practice. This stems partly from fragmented undergraduate education involving isolated lectures and laboratory workshops, with limited clinical exposure to reinforce the practical applications of such knowledge. We wanted to equip students with practical haematological knowledge that could be applied to all areas of medicine.

Summary of work: Students from seven British medical schools (n=73) attended a one-day course covering a curriculum (approved by the British Society for Haematology): blood count investigations, anaemia, coagulopathy, and transfusion medicine. Each subject was taught through interactive small-group sessions led by haematology specialty-trainees. Students gained practical knowledge through solving patient-based haematological problems that commonly arise in all clinical specialties, e.g. reversing raised INR. Efficacy of the course was assessed by pre- and post-course questionnaires that scored student-reported confidence in haematology topics. A pre- and post-course quiz provided objective assessment of student improvement. Summary of results: The students gave positive feedback and found the course very useful. Students reported greater confidence in applying their haematology knowledge (32% mean increase on five-point Likert scale in confidence, p <0.0001), and scored better in the post-course haematology quiz (21% mean improvement, p <0.0001). An additional 10% of the students expressed an interest in haematology as a career after attending the course. Conclusions: Teaching how haematology can be applied in different clinical specialties can improve students'

ABSTRACT BOOK: SESSION 8 TUESDAY 27 AUGUST: 1400-1530

understanding in haematology, and hopefully improve their confidence as a junior-doctor. Take-home messages: Students show more interest in haematology by highlighting its clinical relevance in everyday clinical practice.

8DD/7

Introduction of point of care ultrasound (PoCUS) education during our simulation day for medical students - imaging the inferior vena cava to assess fluid responsiveness

CM Nix (Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Anaesthesia, 2075 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, Ontario

M4N 3M5, Canada)

C Constantinescu (Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Anaesthesia, Toronto, Canada)

M Tavakkoli-Zadeh (Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre,

Anaesthesia, Toronto, Canada)

M Singh (Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre,

Anaesthesia, Toronto, Canada)

C McCartney (Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre,

Anaesthesia, Toronto, Canada)

A Sarmah (Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre,

Anaesthesia, Toronto, Canada)

Background: The evaluation of a patient's intravascular volume status can be aided by the use of portable ultrasound. The 2011 Symington report predicted that "Point of care ultrasound" (PoCUS) will change how medicine is practiced and taught. Since then PoCUS has become part of the medical curricula worldwide to various degrees. Our 2012 undergraduate curriculum change was prompted by 2011 learner feedback, which mentioned that one of our stations contained educational material that had already been taught. Our goal was to introduce new educational content while fostering a new clinical competency. Summary of work: During August 2012 we performed a literature search on the topic of imaging the inferior vena cava (IVC) to assess fluid responsiveness. We consulted emergency medicine, intensive care and anesthesia clinicians currently utilising this modality. Facilitator and student objectives were composed. Facilitators were recruited from the regional anesthesia fellowship program because of their familiarity with ultrasound teaching. After obtaining faculty approval we designed an "Ultrasound IVC Fluid Responsiveness Assessment" interactive station. After an initial structured demonstration by the facilitator each student was supervised as they obtained transverse and longitudinal subxiphoid views of the IVC in a live anatomy model.

Summary of results: Initial mean learner (40 students) evaluation scores (Likert scales) increased from 3/5 (2011) to 4- 5/5 (2012). Student comments wished for "more ultrasound throughout clerkship". Conclusions: Our findings support those of Hoppmann et al (2011) who report that undergraduate students "feel their ultrasound experience enhances their medical education". This work is a step towards the

creation of an integrated ultrasound curriculum for medical students attending the University of Toronto. Take-home messages: Students are interested in learning about point of care ultrasound (PoCUS) during their medical school years. There is increasing international interest in the concept of an integrated ultrasound curriculum for medical students.

8DD/8

Development and evaluation of primary care training program for physicians in disaster area of the Great East Japan Earthquake

Daisuke Son (University of Tokyo, International Research Center for Medical Education, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033, Japan)

Hirotaka Onishi (University of Tokyo, International Research Center for Medical Education, Tokyo, Japan) Morito Kise (Kuji Clinic, Japanese Health and Welfare Co­operative Federation, Kanagawa, Japan) Taijin Kaku (Tokorozawa Clinic, Saitama, Japan)

Background: Our disaster relief team of primary care professionals, PCAT (Japan Primary Care Association, Disaster Relief Project) has dispatched more than 360 professionals to disaster areas since 11th March in 2011. From October in 2011, we started to dispatch senior residents monthly to the disaster-stricken local hospital in Miyagi.

Summary of work: We developed the primary care training program in disaster area for the senior residents, and we evaluated and improved the program according to the action research framework. We included 8 physicians who were dispatched from January 2012 through August 2012 for the research. Summary of results: Our program consists of (1) pre-dispatch training of Psychological First Aid, (2) daily feedback session from staff physicians on site, and (3) weekly reflective session on teleconference (using videoconference system) in which family physicians and psychiatrists joined. The analysis of interviews revealed "needs of consulting psychiatric problems", "needs of continuity of care in chronic disease management", and "the importance of interprofessional collaboration", and we improved our program continuously in the action research cycle. In addition, the interviews revealed what they learned in disaster area such as "understanding the grief of disaster victims", "awareness of lack of resources and poor accessibility in disaster area", "appreciating the importance of public health in the community", and so on.

Conclusions: We developed the primary care training program in disaster area for the senior residents, which emphasizes the continuous support by psychiatrists and family physicians.

Take-home messages: The primary care training program for physicians in disaster area should include psychiatric consulting support.

ABSTRACT BOOK: SESSION 8 TUESDAY 27 AUGUST: 1400-1530

8DD/9

Final Year Medical Students' Confidence in Chest Film Interpretation

Pattarin Paisanpattarin (B Buddhachinnaraj Medical Education Center, Department of Radiology, Department of Radiology, Phitsanulok 65000, Thailand) Pawinee Eamchan (Buddhachinnaraj Medical Education Center, Department of ENT, Phitsanulok, Thailand) Sa-ang Dansawang (Buddhachinnaraj Medical Education Center, Phitsanulok, Thailand)

Background: Today, the chest radiograph remains the most important modality of chest imaging, because of the low cost, effectiveness as a diagnostic tool and availability in every hospital. This study was aimed at studying confidence in chest film interpretation, based on The Medical Council of Thailand's requirements (23 diseases).

Summary of work: We conducted a cross-sectional study in the academic year 2012 in the last week of the 6th year medical students curriculum. They were enrolled to answer the five levels Likert scale questionnaire (Cronbach's alpha reliability = 0.91) that asked for "Confidence in 23 chest film interpretation". Summary of results: The overall mean of 52 students' confidence was 3.68 of 5 points. The top three confidences were pleural effusion (3.91), pneumothorax (3.69) and cardiomegaly (3.69) while the last three confidences were posterior mediastinal mass (2.45), middle mediastinal mass (2.56) and pulmonary hypertension (2.60). More than 75% of students had nearly as good to excellent confidence to interpret common thoracic diseases in Thailand; pneumonia, COPD and pleural effusion (over half of all students had good confidence).

Conclusions: Most of the last year medical students had nearly as good confidence to interpret The Medical Council of Thailand chest film requirements. Take-home messages: Confidence in chest film interpretation is important to smart doctors.

8DD/10

A to A+, a quality improvement program for junior medical students

William J Huang (National Yang-Ming University, School of Medicine, Urology, 201, Sec. 2, Shih-Pai Rd., Taipei 11217, Taiwan)

Ling-Yu Yang (National Yang-Ming University, School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Taipei, Taiwan) Jing-Feng Lirng (National Yang-Ming University, School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Taipei, Taiwan) Chin-Wen Chi (National Yang-Ming University, School of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology, Taipei, Taiwan)

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