Автор неизвестен - Mededworld and amee 2013 conference connect - страница 138

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ABSTRACT BOOK: SESSION 10 WEDNESDAY 28 AUGUST: 0830-1015

group learning activities held in Canada to convert MOC Section 1 credits to European Continuing Medical Education Credits (ECMECs), and Canadian physicians participating in similar activities in the EU to convert

ECMECs to MOC credits.

Conclusions: Through international substantive equivalency agreements, the Royal College has engaged in a process formally recognizing international CPD accreditation and credit systems, expanding the opportunity for physicians to share and learn around the world.

Take-home messages: International collaboration and the substantive equivalency recognition of global CPD accreditation and credit systems enable physicians to receive credit for their participation in a wide variety of continuing professional development activities.

10DD/5

Opening a vast panorama to reach the aim of globalization in Iranian medical students by assessing their viewpoints about "Shine" the first student English magazine

Farzaneh Alipour (Jahrom University of Medical Sciences, Student Research Committee, Shiraz, Iran) Sedighe Najafipour (Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran)

Fakhrolsadat Mirhoseini (Tehran Medical University, Shiraz, Iran)

Maryam Ghasemi (Jahrom University of Medical Sciences, Student Research Committee, Shiraz, Iran)

Background: Learning English is an inevitable necessity since it is the key of medical education. We designed a student English magazine for the first time to satisfy the needs of medical students and also to put certain strides for globalization.

Summary of work: 161 students of JUMS which were selected by a stratified-randomized method participated in this descriptive cross-sectional study. We used a self-instructive, valid questionnaire and data were analyzed by SPSS concerning p value<0.05. Summary of results: The results showed that 60.9% were female and 39.1% were male. Average age was 21.2. 56.3% indicated that contents of the magazine were based on their needs. 57% indicated that it was effective in their improvement of English. 49.7% believed that it represented a new method and model in learning practical English. 53% believed that it presents up-to-date and suitable contents. 89% of them indicated that Shine is the first student English magazine they have ever been familiar with. Conclusions: Taken together, this student English magazine might provide a suitable opportunity for students to refer to international and scientific texts, websites and learn practical English. And the results of this study might be a stimulus for the managers to revise the weak points of English curriculum in medical education.

Take-home messages: Taken together, this student English magazine might provide a suitable opportunity

for students to become interested to English and international texts.

10DD/6

Perceptions and attitudes of medical students and post-graduate residents towards using English as a medium in medical education in Taiwan

Hsin-Yi Lien (Ming Chuan University, Department of Applied English, 5 De Ming Rd., Gui Shan District, Taoyuan County 333, Taiwan)

Background: Medicine education in Taiwan is conducted in Chinese and the instructors emphasized only medical terminologies in English. However, unlike medical students in Hong Kong who use English, as a second language, for the entire curriculum as the medium of instruction, only English medical terminology focus instruction in Taiwan might affect medical students' comprehension of the medical textbooks and might reduce those future medical doctors' academic performance. Whether English should be used as a medium in medical school in Taiwan raises the attention. Most literature advocating this comes from personal feelings and impressions. There are no reports of medical students' opinions and attitude towards this issue.

Summary of work: The study was conducted in the College of Medicine, Chang Kung University, Taiwan. Medical students and post-graduate residents were randomly selected to answer a survey questionnaire which investigated their perceptions and attitudes towards teaching medicine in English. Summary of results: The results indicates the medical students showed a positive attitudes towards teaching medicine in English, with varying opinions regarding when and how it should be done. Conclusions: It was concluded that students and residents support English as a medium in medical education in Taiwan and welcomed English provided it was approached gradually and with adequate planning. A systematic plan to achieve is proposed. Take-home messages: English is essential to be used as a medium while teaching non-native medical students. A systematic plan should be provided in training courses.

10DD/7

Identifying and overcoming language barriers faced by foreign medical students

A Jawien (Poznan University of Medical Sciences,

Department of General and Vascular Surgery, 1/2 Dluga

Street, Poznan 61-848, Poland)

H Stepak (Poznan University of Medical Sciences,

Department of General and Vascular Surgery, Poznan,

Poland)

M Lodyga (Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Department of General and Vascular Surgery, Poznan, Poland)

ABSTRACT BOOK: SESSION 10 WEDNESDAY 28 AUGUST: 0830-1015

G Oszkinis (Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Department of General and Vascular Surgery, Poznan, Poland)

Background: An increasing number of students are considering studying abroad as an alternative to study medicine at their home countries but they encounter considerable challenges in non-Anglo-native-language settings due to the local culture and language. Therefore it affects their ability to communicate with patients directly, making translation-dependent, and can diminish self-confidence in relation to patient. Summary of work: Due to large number of low Polish proficiency Anglo-division students, we devised an on­line survey to investigate foreign students' needs and guide strategy development to improve medical knowledge delivery, with an emphasis on language barriers.

Summary of results: 70 Anglo-division program medical students in their penultimate year were asked to fill the on-line survey, 48 of them responded. 75% (36) were not Polish-proficient. Consistencies were found in responses from both Polish-proficient and non-proficient students. Both groups found an advantage to being Polish-proficient in terms of appropriate communication skills, which influenced on improving their clinical and practical knowledge. They reported compromised student-patient interaction and emphasized the need to minimize the language gap between students and patients. Participants suggested more intensive Polish-language courses in their early academic years and/or including at least one Polish-proficient student in clinical subgroups during rotations. Conclusions: Physicians teaching Anglo-division medical students should be conscientious of language and cultural limitations and try to introduce more individualized teaching methods to minimize differences between Polish-proficient and non-proficient students in terms of patient communications skills. Take-home messages: Anglo-division-non-native medical students are aware of their limitations during academic clinical years and are interested in methods to alleviate language barriers.

10FF ePosters: Assessment: Written and Feedback

Location: North Hall, PCC

10FF/1

Self-monitoring as a strategy to improve performance: a diagnosis based on tests

Flavio Chaimowicz (Federal University of Minas Gerais,

Internal Medicine, Belo Horizonte, Brazil)

Silvana Eloi-Santos (Federal University of Minas Gerais,

Propedeutics, Belo Horizonte, Brazil)

Cassio Ibiapina (Federal University of Minas Gerais,

Pediatrics, Rua Agripa de Vasconcelos, 190, Belo

Horizonte 30.210-030, Brazil)

Anelise Impellizzeri Nogueira (Federal University of

Minas Gerais, Internal Medicine, Belo Horizonte, Brazil)

Background: Self-monitoring mistakes, indicating an inaccurate transition between an automatic mode of practice and reflexive reasoning, are a valuable stimulus to induce self-directed learning among medical students. Nevertheless, little is known about this ability at the intermediate phases of the course. This study investigated the accuracy of self-monitoring in real conditions, using a simple method of assessment. Summary of work: During the final test of a discipline, students of the 4th year were asked to select among the 30 multiple choice questions, the ten they considered to be the easiest and the ten most difficult. They were informed that the questions selected as "easy" would be worth 20% more, and the "hard" ones would be 20% less.

Summary of results: 139 from 141 students agreed to participate. The mean score of the questions selected as "easy" (9.1 out of 10) was more than twice the score of those selected as "difficult" (4.1 out of 10). In the group of students with low scores (below median), the majority completed the test faster (below median). On the other hand, the majority of students whose scores were higher than the median spent longer time to complete the test (chi-square=7.43, p=0.006). The time to complete the test and the scores were similar for men and women, but women scored higher in questions

selected as hard (F=4.44, M=3.81, t-test=2.5, p=0.016).

Conclusions: When faced with questions of moderate levels of difficulty, students were capable of identifying the limits of their knowledge. The process seems to have been more accurate among those who took longer to complete the test, insinuating an advantage of more extensive usage of reflexive thinking. Take-home messages: Self-monitoring processes seem to be accurate at the intermediate phases of the medical course and should be considered when designing strategies to induce self-regulated learning. Although influenced by gender differences, reflexive thinking seems to improve performance.

ABSTRACT BOOK: SESSION 10 WEDNESDAY 28 AUGUST: 0830-1015

10FF/2

Do Students Receive Effective Written Feedback on Supervised Learning Events?

Alexander Nesbitt (University College London, UCL Medical School, London, United Kingdom) (Presenter: Alison Sturrock, UCL Medical School, Academic Centre for Medical Education, 4th Floor Holborn Union Building, Highgate Hill, London N19 5LW, United Kingdom)

Background: Feedback is integral to learning and development. It is one of the top five factors in learner achievement and promotes learning by informing trainees of their progress and of their learning needs. It is reported that more senior students value feedback that is constructive rather than affirmative. Supervised Learning Events (SLEs) were developed to assess performance and increase the amount of feedback given. At University College London Medical School (UCLMS), we have used SLEs since 2008, however students complain about the quality of the feedback provided and therefore question the value of these assessments. The study was designed to assess the quality of written feedback on SLE forms and to determine whether quality varied according to assessor seniority.

Summary of work: A sample of year 4 students was selected to take part using a random number generator. These students were asked to provide their forms for evaluation of the written feedback, in exchange for a gift voucher. A total of 250 forms were received. Feedback was categorised as either: points of good performance, areas for improvement or overall comment. These comments were then graded as weak, neither weak or strong or strong.

Summary of results: Overall 62% of forms were graded weak. By category the number graded weak were 52.8% for points of good performance, 73.6% for areas for improvement and 63.1% for overall comment. There was no difference in the quality of the feedback provided by different grades of doctors. Conclusions: The quality of written feedback on SLEs at UCLMS was relatively poor.

Take-home messages: Assessors completing SLEs need further training in writing constructive feedback.

10FF/3

Student's feedback on their performance based on summative and formative results - extended by a structured selection using combined performance criteria

Alexander Schiffel (RWTH Aachen University, Medical Faculty, Wendlingweg 2, Aachen 52074, Germany) Johann Arias (RWTH Aachen University, Medical Faculty, Aachen, Germany)

Sonja Finsterer (RWTH Aachen University, Medical Faculty, Aachen, Germany)

Background: Since 2012, the Aachen medical faculty combines students' results in both summative and

formative tests to give a better view on the students' performances. The new visibility of performances points to students' problems that previously were hard to detect. An extensive selection of students and thus focussing on special advisory is helpful. Summary of work: According to summative data, comparison of summative and formative data, and the combination of both, lists of students who are in need of assistance are automatically generated to support mentors. Based on these lists, students are invited for individual advisory talks. Students' strengths can be identified not only on summative data but also based on longitudinal formative data.

Summary of results: The application of the selection criteria of students has led to a more specific feedback and to the need of knowledge in very specific aspects of learning, like learning methods, long-time acquisition of knowledge, and exam nerves. As a result, the feedback sessions can be more specific. The new process shows that the workflow needs to be optimized and well documented since additional feedback sessions for the same students are often necessary. Conclusions: A more specific selection of students and the active invitation by the deanery of study affairs has a different outcome than self-motivated mentoring. It is also more costly and needs new structures in certain aspects. The measurement of benefit for students and the faculty is difficult.

Take-home messages: Application of different evaluation criteria enriches the process of students' feedback, making it more effective yet more costly.

10FF/4

Online formative tests linked to microlectures improve academic achievement

Rianne AM Bouwmeester (University Medical Center Utrecht, Medical Physiology, Yalelaan 50, Utrecht 3584 CM, Netherlands)

Renske AM de Kleijn (Utrecht University, Centre for

Teaching and Learning, Utrecht, Netherlands)

Magda J Ritzen (Utrecht University, Centre for Teaching

and Learning, Utrecht, Netherlands)

Olle ThJ ten Cate (University Medical Center Utrecht,

Center for Research and Development of Education,

Utrecht, Netherlands)

Harold VM van Rijen (University Medical Center Utrecht, Medical Physiology, Utrecht, Netherlands)

Background: Online formative tests (OFTs) are powerful tools to direct student learning behaviour, especially when enriched with specific feedback. In the present study, we have investigated the effect of OFTs enriched with (hyper-)links to so called 'microlectures' on study results.

Summary of work: The course 'Organ Systems' focuses sequentially on the Respiratory, the Circulatory and the Urinary organ system and each is finalised by a midterm summative exam (MSE) composed of multiple-choice questions (MCQ). Subsequently, the full course is completed with a final summative exam (FSE) composed of multidisciplinary essay questions.

ABSTRACT BOOK: SESSION 10 WEDNESDAY 28 AUGUST: 0830-1015

For each organ system, OFTs were composed of MCQs with specific feedback explaining the most obvious mistake(s) leading to a particular answer combined with a direct link to the appropriate online microlecture, i.e. fragmented recording of the given lecture. The OFTs were neither obligatory nor rewarded. Previous academic achievement was used as covariate in statistical analyses.

Summary of results: On average 85 students used the online formative tests (OFT+) while preparing for the MSE, whereas 30 did not (OFT-). The average grades for the Circulatory and the Urinary MSEs were significantly higher for OFT+ students compared to OFT- (p< 0.01). The results for the Respiratory MSE approached significance (p= 0.064). Additionally, OFTs seem to improve MSE scores irrespective of students' earlier achievement. Similarly, FSE scores were higher for OFT+ students, albeit not significant.

Conclusions: The use of OFTs helped students to achieve better grades, presumably by identifying gaps in their knowledge especially in highly aligned summative tests.

10FF/5

Occurrence of feedback in a German family medicine rotation

Lisa Roth (Marburg University, Department of General Practice/Family Medicine, Karl-von-Frisch-Str. 4, Marburg D-35043, Germany)

Gertrude Duncan (Marburg University, Department of General Practice/Family Medicine, Marburg, Germany) Norbert Donner-Banzhoff (Marburg University, Department of General Practice/Family Medicine, Marburg, Germany)

Stefan Boesner (Marburg University, Department of General Practice/Family Medicine, Marburg, Germany)

Background: The curriculum of German medical schools requires a two-week-rotation in family-medicine, however there is scarce data describing whether students receive feedback by the teaching physicians and how this is applied. Summary of work: Data were collected ethnographically. Two researchers observed the interaction between teaching physicians and students during the individual patient contacts over a period of nine months. The resulting data were recorded using a pre-designed field note form. Data collection was performed in 12 general practice teaching practices associated with Marburg University, Germany. It was observed, amongst other things, whether the students received feedback, and whether this was applied in a positive or negative, or in a specific or non-specific way. Summary of results: Feedback occurred in only 32.2 % of the 410 observed patient consultations. Of these, it was mostly non-specific and positive (68.9 %), and occurred during consultation with the patient present. In addition, specific negative feedback was frequently used (29.5%). Specific positive and non-specific negative response was rarely given.

Conclusions: Feedback is mostly non-specific, positive and given when the patient is still present. Non-specific

positive feedback like "OK" or "Good!" does not enable the German students to gather important information to improve their performance. The German teaching physicians should be sensitized for the effectiveness of this important tool and also instructed in different feedback techniques.

Take-home messages: Feedback is only sparsely integrated in the undergraduate education of family medicine in Germany.

10FF/6

Effectiveness of Integrated Assessment of Basic Medical Sciences

Muhammad Iqbal Khan (AJKMC, Medical Education, AJK Medical College, Muzaffarabad 53720, Pakistan) Muhammad Saeed Shafi (AJKMC, Anatomy, Muzaffarabad, Pakistan) Sarmud Latif Awan (AJKMC, Anatomy & Surgery, Muzaffarabad, Pakistan)

Syed Sajid Shah (AJKMC, Pathology, Muzaffarabad, Pakistan)

Ziyad Afzal Kayani (AJKMC, Surgery, Muzaffarabad, Pakistan)

Mohsin Shakil (AJKMC, Urology, Muzaffarabad, Pakistan)

Background: To contextualize training and assessment of Basic Health Sciences (BHS) and make BHS practicals relevant to the clinical practice, we introduced innovative assessment IPA (Integrated Practical Assessment) in 2011. The IPA blueprint consisted of 17-stations OSPE, each based on a clinical theme and 2-3 integrated tasks involving application of BHS knowledge with clinical and generic skills. Each station was directly/indirectly observed by trained faculty. Summary of work: An exploratory case study, using mixed method approach (with a dominant qualitative focus) was conducted at AJK Medical College during academic year-2012. All voluntary participants of Class of 2016 were given a semi-structured questionnaire immediately after IPA and a focus group discussion was conducted with 25 randomly selected participants, recorded digitally, transcribed, coded and categorized into themes. Questionnaire data was analyzed for descriptive statistics. Triangulation of data was done. Summary of results: Students validated the IPE with positive perceptions. "IPA made us clinically more competent. It improved peer interaction and interpersonal skills. It enabled us to interact with patients and their families unhesitantly". Conclusions: IPA is a validated tool of performance assessment, even in a resource constrained environment.

Take-home messages: Psychometrics do matter; however, acceptability of assessment to all stakeholders must be explored by qualitative research.

ABSTRACT BOOK: SESSION 10 WEDNESDAY 28 AUGUST: 0830-1015

10FF/7

Evaluation of Curriculum by Progress Test

Omer Tontus (Ondokuz Mayis Uni. Medical School, Medical Education, Samsun, Turkey) Ozlem Midik (Ondokuz Mayis Uiversity, Medical Education, Omu Tip Dekanlik, Atakum 55555, Turkey)

Background: Progress test is a test of the whole learning process. Questions are chosen depending on the complete learning objectives of medical school and this can give the opportunity to evaluate the curriculum. Summary of work: We aimed to examine the use of progress tests in a matrix table as part of a feedback process to the curriculum designer and evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of the curriculum. PT was introduced to our students since 2009. We used 200 MCQ single best answer format questions from 40 departments in 11 different organ systems. In total we gathered 713790 answers from students' paper based tests. The Matrix Analysis Table is constructed by question answers tagged to departments' educational activities, followed by evaluation of departments depending on students' response with predetermined difficulty indexed questions. Summary of results: Answers are embedded to the matrix table to take a snapshot of the curriculum. In a table we summarized organ systems in columns and departments in rows. Endocrine and Metabolism system questions were best correct answers rate while Urogenital System lowest. Infectious Disease Department is rated worst by students' answers as feedback. But by using matrix table we found infectious disease question, which related respiratory system having good correct rate while cardiovascular infectious disease was worst. Such results provide us with the opportunity to criticize a specific point. Conclusions: Our results show that progress testing is a valid and reliable instrument to evaluate effectiveness of departments and divisions in undergraduate medical education.

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