Автор неизвестен - Mededworld and amee 2013 conference connect - страница 19

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Conclusions: This study suggests congruence between student and program perceptions of the scope of practice required for GHD. The findings indicate students see the need for enhanced levels of skills in the careers they anticipate.

Take-home messages: Formulating and reflecting on competencies can guide curriculum in aligning learning experiences with students' emerging career goals.

ABSTRACT BOOK: SESSION 2 MONDAY 26 AUGUST: 0830-1015

2GG/9

Enhancing Healthcare Professional Training: A collaboration between the School of Medicine, University of St Andrews, UK and the College of Medicine (COM) Blantyre, Malawi

Simon Guild (University of St Andrews, School of Medicine, North Haugh, St Andrews KY16 9TF, United Kingdom)

Susan Whiten (University of St Andrews, School of Medicine, St Andrews, United Kingdom) Amanda Fleet (University of St Andrews, School of Medicine, St Andrews, United Kingdom) Mwapatsa Mipando (University of Malawi, College of Medicine, Blantyre, Malawi)

Background: St Andrews is collaborating with College of Medicine (COM) Blantyre to assist the College with a major review of all its allied health professional undergraduate curricula. These changes are driven by the need to modernize these curricula and to maximize the efficiency of the input of the basic medical sciences to these programmes. The two medical schools have recently gone through a similar exercise for the undergraduate medical program at the COM. Summary of work: As a result of two joint curriculum planning conferences in Blantyre, the COM has designed and is taking forward new degree programmes for Pharmacy, Physiotherapy, Medical Laboratory Sciences and is introducing a new B.Sc Honours in Biomedical Sciences. All COM academic staff responsible for these programmes met and considered a proposed common course structure model.

Summary of results: It was decided that new healthcare professional curricula be developed that will adhere to a plan using core integrated basic medical sciences courses in all the degree programmes and other specific courses tailored to the needs of the individual degree programmes. This will permit the achievement of the desired efficiencies in teaching and specific curriculum outcomes.

Conclusions: The harmonisation of degree programme structures and the use of common and specific integrated courses throughout all degree programmes can meet the needs of the COM for the review of its Allied Healthcare Training Programmes. Take-home messages: Healthcare professional training can be enhanced and made more efficient by adopting common degree structures utilising common core and specific course options.

2GG/10

Reache North West, 10 years of supporting refugee healthcare professionals

Duncan Cross (Salford Royal Foundation NHS Trust, Reache North West, Stott Lane, Salford M6 8HD, United Kingdom)

Maeve Keaney (Salford Royal Foundation NHS Trust, Reache North West, Salford, United Kingdom) Ann Smalldridge (Salford Royal Foundation NHS Trust, Reache North West, Salford, United Kingdom)

Mick Sykes (Salford Royal Foundation NHS Trust, Reache North West, Salford, United Kingdom)

Background: Reache North West provides education and training for refugee and asylum seeking healthcare professionals

Summary of work: Reache North West is a unique hospital based unit that provides a variety of educational and training resources to help asylum seeking and refugee healthcare professionals enter work in their professional roles in the UK. Courses include; English language training, medical knowledge and skills training, safe and effective clinical communication skills, preparing for work in the UK, clinical reasoning, and employability skills. We also provide a range of supervised work placements to help transition into the UK workforce.

Summary of results: Over 140 refugee health care professionals have returned to their professional roles with many others finding alternative employment in healthcare. Reache North West has supported several short-term opportunities that have led to paid alternative careers.

Conclusions: Not only have we helped refugees gain employment in the UK but we have also helped refugees integrate into communities. Successful Refugee Healthcare Professionals (RHPs) give their communities renewed hope of integration and employment. We not only provide a valuable service for the RHPs but also the National Health Service, helping to meet local and national workforce demands at a fraction of the cost of usual medical training.

Take-home messages: Refugee healthcare professionals are a valuable resource to their host countries if given appropriate training and support.

2GG/11

'Medical educators on the move': experiences of international medical educators

Ana L Da Silva (Swansea University, College of Medicine, Swansea University, Singleton Campus, Swansea SA2 8PP, United Kingdom)

Michelle Mclean (Bond University, Faculty of Health Sciences and Medicine, Queensland, Australia) Judy Mckimm (Swansea University, College of Medicine, Swansea, United Kingdom)

Stella Major (United Arab Emirates University, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates)

Background: Internationalisation is a key element of higher education (Enders & Teichler, 2005). In 2006, Harden set out a vision of "transnational" medical education, where international medical educators would teach groups of international students and institutions would establish strong cross-border collaborations for teaching and research (Harden 2006). Almost a decade after that vision where are we now? Summary of work: An online survey on experiences as an international medical educator was conducted. Data

ABSTRACT BOOK: SESSION 2 MONDAY 26 AUGUST: 0830-1015

were analysed using TAMS Analyzer (qualitative) and SPSS19.0 (quantitative).

Summary of results: Data were collected from 89 participants from 29 different countries in all continents with an average international experience of 9.3 years. The main themes identified were consistent across age, gender and across different training locations. Conclusions: Our results show that "transnational" medical education is still not the most predominant reality among international medical educators. Although educators are becoming more international, the student population remains local. These results will be discussed along with reasons for internationalisation, barriers and perceived advantages for both the students and the employers.

Take-home messages: Internationalization is perceived as very valuable if all involved (students, teachers and institutions) are prepared for the experience and to face challenges.

The reasons for where educators choose to work are multi-factorial, but consistent themes emerge regarding barriers and critical success factors independent of country and culture.

2GG/12

Higher interest in Global Health topics among students of the International Bachelor of Medicine

Rensia R. Bakker (University of Groningen, Institute for Medical Education, University Medical Center Groningen, FC40, P.O. Box 196, Groningen 9700 AD, Netherlands)

Nico A. Bos (University of Groningen, Institute for Medical Education, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands) Hans V. Hogerzeil (University of Groningen, Institute for Medical Education, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands)

Background: With increasing globalization, there is a great need for integration of Global Health (GH) in the medical curricula. We adopted the 21 proposed GH learning outcomes as formulated by Johnson et al. (Lancet, 2012) in an integrated country-based approach in the International Bachelor Medicine Groningen (IBMG) programme. In the standard (NL) Bachelor curriculum GH topics are not explicitly taught. We measured the interest in the GH learning outcomes among first year IBMG students as well as among those following the NL curriculum.

Summary of work: We evaluated students' interest in the 21 GH learning outcomes by questionnaire. These outcomes were measured on a 1-5 Likert scale (5: very interesting, 1: not interesting). We collected additional information on career plans.

Summary of results: Response rate was 92% for year 1 IBMG (n= 68) and 65 % for NL students (n= 233). The overall score of the 21 GH learning outcomes among the IBMG students (M= 3,83) was significantly above those among the NL students (M= 3,03) (p < 0.001). Amongst

IBMG students 17 % considers a career in Public Health compared to 3% of NL students. Conclusions: Medical students within the IBMG programme are significantly more interested in the topics of the 21 proposed GH learning outcomes within their curriculum than those following the NL standard curriculum. The GH profile suits the students' interest in the IBMG programme which is in line with their increased career intentions for Public Health. Take-home messages: The 21 GH learning outcomes fit well with the interests of the students starting in the IBMG programme.

2GG/13

A Rapid Intervention to Improve Somali Cultural Competency in Minnesota Medical Students

Elizabeth Fracica (Mayo Clinic, Mayo Medical School, 207 5th Ave., Apt. 608, Rochester 55902, United States) Sagar Chawla (Mayo Clinic, Mayo Medical School, Rochester, United States) Adeel Zubair (Mayo Clinic, Mayo Medical School, Rochester, United States)

James Newman (Mayo Clinic, Department of Internal Medicine, Rochester, United States)

Background: Cultural competency has been shown to improve the physician-patient relationship and promote positive health outcomes for patients in numerous studies, yet many U.S. medical schools do not incorporate formal cultural training into their curricula. Mayo Medical students have many opportunities to interact with Somali patients throughout their training due to the large Somali immigrant population in Rochester, MN. The purpose of this study is to determine medical student understanding of Somali culture, how comfortable students feel interacting with Somalis, and to understand how much students would learn from a culturally-immersive educational lunch meeting on Somali culture.

Summary of work: Forty-eight students completed a pre-survey at the start of the meeting, and students returned 2 months later to complete the same survey to assess student learning. Students enjoyed dishes native to Somali, learned how to communicate using basic Somali phrases, received a list of Somali recipes to try at home, and listened to a presentation from one of the Mayo Clinic translators native to Somalia. Students learned about the history of Somalia, major public health concerns, religious beliefs, and barriers to accessing care. The surveys assessed the knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors of the students towards the Somali population.

Summary of results: Pre-survey data demonstrated that most students had little prior knowledge of Somali culture, and 38 of 48 (79%) of survey participants said they believed their lack of knowledge of Somali culture might limit the quality of care they can provide. Additionally, 19 of 48 (40%) of survey participants said they felt uncomfortable treating Somali patients altogether.

ABSTRACT BOOK: SESSION 2 MONDAY 26 AUGUST: 0830-1015

Conclusions: Remainder of results to be gathered by late March.

SESSION 3: Simultaneous Sessions

Monday 26 August: 1045-1230

3A Symposium: What is excellence in education and can we measure it?

Location: Congress Hall, PCC

Trudie Roberts (University of Leeds, UK) (Chair) David Wilkinson (The University of Queensland, Australia)

Sandy Cook (Duke-NUS, Singapore) Liz Anderson (The Higher Education Academy, UK) Khalid Bin Abdulrahman (Al-Imam University, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia)

Over the past decade there has been a move to recognise excellence in a wide range of domains. This symposium will look at how the concept of excellence can be applied to medical education. It will examine the case for looking at a form of quality assurance that goes beyond the concept of accreditation. It will explore criteria that might be used to define excellence in education and how these can be evaluated. Following opening presentations from a range of perspectives, participants will be invited to express their views on the subject.

3B Symposium: "Don't mention the 'd' word": Balancing living with dying in medical education and practice

Location: Meeting Hall I, PCC

Sarah Yardley (Keele University and Specialist Registrar in Palliative Medicine, West Midlands Deanery, UK) Debbie Jaarsma (Academic Medical Centre, University of Amsterdam, the Netherlands)

Fedde Scheele (VU University Medical Centre, St Lucas Andreas Hospital, Amsterdam, the Netherlands) Michiel Westerman (VU Medical Centre, Amsterdam, the Netherlands)

Esther Helmich (Academic Medical Centre, University of Amsterdam, the Netherlands)

Death and dying are an unavoidable part of medical practice. Despite changes in professional-patient interactions, students and doctors continue to report lack of competence and confidence when confronted with someone living with the reality of life-limiting illness. This symposium explores balancing patient-centred care with professional resilience when engaging with issues of life and death. Presenters will provide teaching and learning examples from practice as educators and clinicians in Internal Medicine, Obstetrics & Gynaecology, and Palliative Medicine. Ethical, legal and practical curriculum challenges will be discussed. Participants will develop ideas for workplace-based learning opportunities in the context of death and dying.

3C Short Communications: Staff/Faculty Development 2

Location: Panorama, PCC 3C/1

Enhancing Teaching Effectiveness: The Heidelberg Medical Faculty development program

Gerald Wibbecke (Heidelberg University, HeiCuMed, Im Neuenheimer Feld 155, Heidelberg 69120, Germany) Martina Kadmon (Heidelberg University, Department for General, Visceral, and Transplantation Surgery, Heidelberg, Germany)

Background: Steinert et al. (2006) offered guidelines for the research of programs designed to enhance teaching effectiveness. Based on their suggestions, we performed a prospective longitudinal study to evaluate our faculty development intervention program. This intervention is intended to train medical teachers in modern teaching techniques, primarily focussing on the implementation of the principle of "constructive alignment" (Biggs & Tang, 2007) in courses and curriculum. Approximately 80 teachers complete this training every year. The participants in the program were asked to take part in our study.

Summary of work: The study consisted of self-assessment at the beginning and the end of the intervention (approximately a year apart), self-observation, and observation by a colleague and an expert during lessons. It included three intervention cohorts and a comparison group. The analysis focused primarily on different levels of outcome: Reaction, Learning, Behaviour, and Results. Additionally, students were asked by questionnaire to define good teaching from their perspective.

Summary of results: The data indicate that trained teachers make use of more varied didactic approaches, enhance their communication with the students especially in large-class situations, and develop a more student-centred approach to teaching. Conclusions: The findings support both the notion that it is promising to equip medical teachers with teaching skills and the need to accompany training programs by multi-facetted evaluation instruments to monitor and reflect changes in teaching behaviour, while also considering the student perspective. Take-home messages: Participants report satisfaction with the program and a change in attitudes and teaching behaviour, but it is still possible to increase the efficiency of the program.

3C/2 (13993)

Faculty development initiatives designed to improve teaching process in the Family Medicine course

Venija Cerovecki (University of Zagreb, School of Medicine, Department for Family Medicine, Rockefellerova 4, Salata 3, Zagreb 10000, Croatia)

ABSTRACT BOOK: SESSION 3 MONDAY 26 AUGUST: 1045-1230

Milica Katic (University of Zagreb, School of Medicine, Department for Family Medicine, Zagreb, Croatia) Sanja Blazekovic Milakovic (University of Zagreb, School of Medicine, Department for Family Medicine, Zagreb, Croatia)

Zlata Ozvacic Adzic (University of Zagreb, School of Medicine, Department for Family Medicine, Zagreb, Croatia)

Background: During the final year of the 6-year undergraduate medical curriculum of School of Medicine, University of Zagreb, students spend 140 hours at family medicine course. During this course students spend 60 hours in theoretical education and 80 hours in selected family medicine practices. The teachers and trainers in selected family medicine practices are healthcare professionals involved in the teaching during the family medicine course. Summary of work: The teachers and established trainers worked together and designed a two-day course in order to prepare healthcare professionals for teaching in the family medicine.

Summary of results: The course will be organized in two days. During the first day, the structure of the family medicine course as well as principles of development follow-up of the students will be presented. Activities in the second day will enable healthcare professionals for work based assessment (CbD, DOPS, Mini-CEX), designing problems and for mentoring the students in preparing the portfolio as a self-reflective tool. Conclusions: Faculty development activities and initiatives have to assist faculty members and healthcare professionals involved in the teaching to fulfil their multiple roles as family physicians, teachers and researches. Faculty development programmes and initiatives must be relevant and adjusted to teachers' needs and interests. If the faculty development interventions cover the healthcare professionals teaching needs, participants will evaluate this activity as very useful for their professional development as teachers.

Take-home messages: Preparing healthcare professionals for teaching is an essential activity for the improvement of teaching effectiveness.

3C/3

MEDUSA: staff development made possible

Selma Omer (University of Southampton, Faculty of

Medicine, Medical Education Development Unit (MEDU),

B85, Life Sciences Building, Highfield Campus,

Southampton SO171BJ, United Kingdom)

Sunhea Choi (University of Southampton, Faculty of

Medicine, Southampton, United Kingdom)

Marcus Parry (University of Southampton, Faculty of

Medicine, Southampton, United Kingdom)

Faith Hill (University of Southampton, Faculty of

Medicine, Southampton, United Kingdom)

Background: Attending staff development training events can be difficult for busy university staff and clinicians. To address this and complement existing face-

to-face training, we developed an online training portal, MEDUSA (Medical Education Development Unit Staff-development Access), at the University of Southampton. Summary of work: Based on Kolb's experiential learning cycle, each module was designed to facilitate interactive, reflective and flexible learning. Seven modules are currently available on: teaching practices (lectures, feedback, student assistantships); assessment (mini-CEX, OSCE); diversity; and transition to clinical learning. MEDUSA records data allowing users to manage their learning and the Faculty to keep records. To assess its effectiveness, evaluation components (profiles analysis, activity analysis and module evaluation) were built into MEDUSA. Summary of results: Since March 2011, nearly 500 staff - both academic and clinical - completed MEDUSA modules. Take-up of face-to-face staff development during this time was unaffected, indicating that MEDUSA provided alternative opportunities for those unable to attend these events, Assessment and diversity modules were most highly used (368). Most completed one module (89.3%), reflecting varied training needs. Preliminary analysis shows that the modules were highly rated (n=160), on relevance (mean of 4.31 [1-5 point scale from very dissatisfied to very satisfied]), meeting learning needs (4.21), maintaining interest (4.26), interactivity (4.17) and easy navigation (4.23). Conclusions: MEDUSA provided an interactive and flexible learning approach, increasing opportunities for staff development. Further study will explore user experience in-depth.

Take-home messages: Online staff training like MEDUSA can allow busy staff to access staff development at their own convenience and address their training needs.

3C/4

Use of 'Problem Based Learning' as a faculty development approach

Rahila Yasmeen (Riphah International University, 274,IIMCTAl Mizan Complex, Peshawar Road Rawalpindi, Islamabad 46000, Pakistan)

Background: To explore faculty experience about 'problem based learning' used as a FD approach, in understanding and applying the core concepts & issues in health professions education, through their views and opinions. It was a qualitative study i.e. 'phenomenology', explored how faculty experienced the 'problem based learning' as a strategy to teach them core concepts & issues in health professions education. Summary of work: Total 16 faculty members from three batches of post graduate certificate course in Medical Education, participated in-depth, semi structured interviews at Riphah International University- Pakistan. Faculties were asked about their experiences with the PBL used to train them. The interviews were qualitatively analyzed using psychological phenomenology. The data verbatim transcribed, coded thematically, manually and finally conclusions are drawn based on the connections about its meaning personally and theoretically.

ABSTRACT BOOK: SESSION 3 MONDAY 26 AUGUST: 1045-1230

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