Автор неизвестен - Mededworld and amee 2013 conference connect - страница 30

Страницы:
1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  30  31  32  33  34  35  36  37  38  39  40  41  42  43  44  45  46  47  48  49  50  51  52  53  54  55  56  57  58  59  60  61  62  63  64  65  66  67  68  69  70  71  72  73  74  75  76  77  78  79  80  81  82  83  84  85  86  87  88  89  90  91  92  93  94  95  96  97  98  99  100  101  102  103  104  105  106  107  108  109  110  111  112  113  114  115  116  117  118  119  120  121  122  123  124  125  126  127  128  129  130  131  132  133  134  135  136  137  138  139  140 

M. V. L. Vasconcelos (Universidade Federal de Alagoas, Faculdade de Medicina, Av. Lourival Melo Mota, s/n, Tabuleiro dos Martins, Maceio - AL 57072-900, Brazil)

Background: Given the need to train health professionals with different skills, the Federal University of Sao Paulo, Santos-Brazil, implemented an innovative curriculum for five undergraduate courses. The proposal included a curriculum design organized into axes and modules with an emphasis on interprofessional education (IPE), teamwork, collaborative practice. Summary of work: This study proposed to analyze the perception regarding the adequacy of these educational practices in relation to a curriculum based on IPE. A semi-structured questionnaire was administered in the classroom to 120 students and to 25 faculty who responded to the same questionnaire by email. The questionnaire had open and closed questions about the degree of agreement regarding the implementation of the curriculum, expected competencies, educational strategies used, obstacles faced and a narrative of the last class attended or taught. Data was analyzed for simple frequency and analysis of the content. Summary of results: The students' perceptions in the narratives showed that most of the faculty use active methodologies and problem solving. Like the students, the faculty reported the use of these methodologies to train professionals with skills in teamwork and collaborative practice. They recognize the changes in educational practice after enrolling at the University and consider themselves prepared to use active methods. The narrative of these faculty identified educational practices that are aligned with the curriculum proposals. Conclusions: We conclude that there are examples of practices that are consistent with the integrated curriculum, making learning from an interprofessional perspective possible.

Take-home messages: The most important lesson learned was the identification of those teachers with the potential to be multipliers.

3AA/14

Interprofessional simulations at an undergraduate level

Anna Arvidsson (Medical Sciences, Flogstavagen 81 A -111, Uppsala 75272, Sweden) Martin Wohlin (Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular Epidemiology, Uppsala, Sweden)

Background: Interprofessional education (IPE) in health care education is spreading worldwide. At Uppsala University Interprofessional Simulations (IPS) has been part of the curriculum since 2011. Participants are medical and nursing students from their last semester. This study aims to collect and summarize today's knowledge of IPE in Sweden and examine the new IPS. The study is a pilot with the purpose of finding approaches and methods for future studies. Summary of work: We used a triangulation of methods consisting of a literature study, questionnaires and one focus group interview. Part of the questionnaires consisted of the Readiness for Interprofessional Learning

Scale (RIPLS).

Summary of results: We found 18 published articles concerning IPE at a undergraduate level in Sweden.

ABSTRACT BOOK: SESSION 3 MONDAY 26 AUGUST: 1045-1230

None of these concerned IPS at an undergraduate level. 24 students filled in our "Before questionnaire" and 20 filled in our "After questionnaire". Three students attended our focus group interview. Conclusions: According to the results from both questionnaires and focus group interview IPS are appreciated by the students. The students also esteem highly on questions concerning whether they acquired any knowledge during the simulations. Our results from the RIPLS questions suggest that nursing students as well as female students in general have a more positive approach to teamwork compared to medicine and male students respectively.

Take-home messages: Many studies show that health care students appreciate IPE. The next step is to investigate the long-term effects on both attitudes and knowledge. We also suggest the use of a theoretical framework when planning future studies. One that we find suitable is The Kirkpatrick Model.

3AA/15

Q. What do medical students get up to at the weekend? A. They sign up to be part of an enhanced multi-professional weekend team on the medical wards

Ishaac Awatli (East Kent Hospitals University NHS Foundation Trust, Medical Education Directorate, William Harvey Hospital, Kennington Road, Willesborough, Ashford, Kent TN24 0LZ, United Kingdom)

Anushka Sieunarine (East Kent Hospitals University NHS

Foundation Trust, Medical Education Directorate,

Ashford, Kent, United Kingdom)

Prathibha Bandipalyam (East Kent Hospitals University

NHS Foundation Trust, Medical Education Directorate,

Ashford, Kent, United Kingdom)

Susan Kennedy (East Kent Hospitals University NHS

Foundation Trust, Medical Education Directorate,

Ashford, Kent, United Kingdom)

Background: East Kent Hospitals University NHS Foundation Trust (EKHUFT) has been awarded pilot monies by Health Education England as part of the Better Training, Better Care Project. As part of our pilot, EKHUFT has created an enhanced multi-professional weekend team - a registrar, a senior nurse, an F1 doctor and a healthcare assistant - that works exclusively on the medical wards. We asked our medical students if they would like to experience weekend working within this team.

Summary of work: Each new cohort of medical students is given information on the pilot and is invited to become part of the 'cold' weekend team for at least one weekend. Between October 2012 and February 2013 the experiences of some of those medical students and other members of the team were captured. Summary of results: 100% of students strongly agreed/agreed that: There were specific learning opportunities for them, they had more time to talk to seniors, they had more time to spend with patients, they were more prepared for working weekends as a

foundation doctors, all medical students should experience weekend working before becoming a doctor. Medical registrars, foundation doctors and nurses felt that the medical students were a valuable addition to the weekend team and that the experience offered useful learning opportunities to them. Conclusions: A safe, supportive weekend environment can provide medical students with unique opportunities for learning as a valued team member. Take-home messages: Medical students enjoy opportunities to participate in innovative projects and they will give up their own time to participate in learning activities that they feel are of real benefit.

3AA/16

Effectiveness of early-stage Interprofessional Education (IPE) for university students' thorough practical training

Takeshi Yamamoto (Sapporo Medical University, Center for Medical Education, South-1, West-17, Chuo-ku, Sapporo 060-8556, Japan)

Yasuyoshi Naishiro (Sapporo Medical University, Center

for Medical Education, Sapporo, Japan)

Masanori Shiratori (Sapporo Medical University, Center

for Medical Education, Sapporo, Japan)

Hiroshi Takeda (Sapporo Medical University, Research

Institute for Frontier Medicine, Sapporo, Japan)

Hitoshi Sohma (Sapporo Medical University, Center for

Medical Education, Sapporo, Japan)

Background: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of Interprofessional Education that is implemented soon after students enter university. Sapporo Medical University, located in Hokkaido region of northern Japan, has four departments: Medicine, Nursing, Physical Therapy, and Occupational Therapy. The program for the first year students was updated in 2012, with the aim of improving students' communication skills and providing them with the knowledge and attitudes they will need for collaborative practice. In the first semester (March to July), lectures are held once a week. In August, a three- to four-day long practical training session is held at rural hospitals and long term care facilities. In the second semester (October to January), lectures and exercises are held once a week.

Summary of work: We examined changes in social skills (Kikuchi's Scale of Social Skills (KiSS-18)) and Readiness for Interprofessional Learning Scale (RIPLS) scores before and after practical training. Changes before and after practical training (main effect), gender (main effect), and gender-based differences in changes before and after practical training (interaction effect) were examined using a repeated measures analysis of variance. 39 students completed both surveys. Summary of results: Scores on KiSS-18 and two RIPLS subscales (Teamwork and Collaboration, IPE Opportunities) improved significantly for male students, whereas scores on the third RIPLS subscale (Uniqueness of Profession) increased significantly for female students.

Conclusions: This study found that: (1) practical training in IPE implemented early on has a short-term effect, and (2) effects vary depending on gender.

3BB Posters: Simulation

Location: South Hall, PCC

3BB/1

Enhancing self-confidence by the emergency ultrasound simulation training for medical trainees

Pei-Chun Lin (Far Eastern Memorial Hospital, Department of Medical Education, 6F, No. 21, Section 2, Nan-Ya South Road, New Taipei City 220, Taiwan) Jen-Tang Sun (Far Eastern Memorial Hospital, Department of Emergency, New Taipei City, Taiwan) Yun Chen (Far Eastern Memorial Hospital, Department of Medical Education, New Taipei City, Taiwan) Shu-Hsun Chu (Far Eastern Memorial Hospital, Cardiovascula Center, New Taipei City, Taiwan)

Background: Ultrasound examination (UE) is widely used for emergency patients. Focused cardiac UE is useful for unstable emergency patients. However, medical students and junior residents are not familiar with the procedures of UE. We provide a simulation course for medical trainees by using virtual reality simulator to improve the knowledge and basic skills of emergency focused cardiac UE.

Summary of work: The simulation was conducted by 24 medical trainees at Far Eastern Memorial Hospital in Taiwan and was done structurally by giving a 40 minutes lecture, and using the ultrasound simulator for practices in an emergency setting. Each trainees was received a post-test by having structured simulation exam and filled in a questionnaire regarding self-confidence in analyzing long and short axis, cardiac wall motion, pericardial effusion and the meaning of RV, LV and IVC size before and after simulation training. Summary of results: Trainees indicated that the capability of image reading and familiarity of ultrasound equipment are the most barriers of learning UE. All trainees agreed that simulation training could enhance their self-confidence. 86.4% trainees answered Hypovolemic shock correctly and 87.5% performed correctly in 4 chamber view in the post-test. Moreover, 41% trainees are agreed that this course could improve their knowledge of cardiac UE in dealing with emergency condition timely and all trainees are recommended this course.

Conclusions: Focus cardiac UE simulation training can enhance their capability in performing ultrasound and interpretations. Trainees can construct their self-confidence and improve their skills through simulation training and thus can manage emergency patients timely and correctly.

Take-home messages: Simulation UE training is useful and important in treating emergency patients.

3BB/2

Maternity: The role of human factors and simulation in the training and assessment of the current and future workforce

ABSTRACT BOOK: SESSION 3 MONDAY 26 AUGUST: 1045-1230

Angie Velinor (University College London Hospitals,

Maternity, Elizabeth Garrett Anderson Wing, 235 Euston

Road, London NW1 2BU, United Kingdom)

Colleen Wedderburn Tate (University College London

Hospitals, Maternity, London, United Kingdom)

Deirdre Nagle (University College London Hospitals,

Maternity, London, United Kingdom)

Melissa Whitten (University College London Hospitals,

Maternity, London, United Kingdom)

Sasha Wilson (University College London Hospitals,

Haematology & Transfusion, London, United Kingdom)

Amanda Green (Cognisco, London, United Kingdom)

Background: Analysis of serious incidents within obstetrics highlighted the need for staff to be skilled in prompt recognition and management of patients at risk of rapid clinical deterioration. Key national publications also highlighted human factors and non-technical skills as areas of focus for the improvement of maternity services. The revision of mandatory training within our healthcare organisation was a strategic starting point. Summary of work: The shift from mere attendance to competency based assessment was the first step toward the 'proactive update' for clinicians to promote safe care. The vehicle of choice was simulation training. Simulation provides the opportunity to train in a safe environment yet still elicits real time responses as an aid to learning. An online assessment tool was developed to assess key knowledge goals relating to recognition and management of the patient at risk of deterioration. Multidisciplinary faculty and participant evaluation of scenarios enabled input into service development within the clinical workplace and the recruitment of staff. Summary of results: The simulation training programme has been undertaken by all staff and trainees. Online assessment has demonstrated measurable improvements in understanding and confidence in addition to an improvement in clinical outcomes. Conclusions: Implementation of high-fidelity simulation training is achievable with a committed training faculty and senior divisional support. Online assessment enables effective training needs analysis for individuals and groups regarding clinical management and human factors awareness. This also supports the patient safety focus for both training programme development, service development in the clinical environment and recruitment.

Take-home messages: Teams that work together should train together.

3BB/3

Simulation technology applied to the pathophysiology courses

Jana Plevkova (Jessenius Faculty of Medicine, Simulation Center, Novomeskeho Str 7, Martin 036 01, Slovakia) Ferdinand Varga (Jessenius Faculty of Medicine, Simulation Center, Martin, Slovakia)

Background: Pathophysiology is the key course in undergraduate medical education. Understanding of the mechanisms of diseases is the underlying condition for

students to learn further, how to recognize signs and symptoms of diseases and to support their „clinical thinking". Position of pathophysiology in the curriculum is on the border between theoretical and clinical disciplines, and we would rather want it to be a link between these two.

Summary of work: To support understanding of pathological processes and to demonstrate clinical application of obtained knowledge, we decided to apply simulation technology to the pathophysiology courses. Seminars (acid base disorders, shock, heart and respiratory failure) had been selected as optimal to utilize Meti MUSE software and Meti Man Prehospital full body manikin to demonstrate onset, progression and consequences of pathological processes. Employment of patient simulator for this purpose is quite "unusual", as it serves for demonstration rather than for intervention/medication purposes or skills training. Physiological functions and vital signs are modified to show progression of chosen process. Students observe "fast-forwarded" deterioration or improvement of patient status, they can intervene with "what if..." suggestions, switch between pre­programmed scenarios, discuss and compare symptoms and their causation.

Summary of results: Feedback performed at the end of the semester revealed positive outcomes from the students' side. They were able to see directly clinical application of presented pathological processes with better retention of the knowledge. When asked for overall impression from the course, 100% of responding students agreed on the fact that "use of simulation technologies has significant contribution to the quality of the course".

3BB/4

Can we use simulation training to ensure minimum competency of medical students in performing a Pap smear in patients?

Yuphadee Tokhao (Medical Education Center, Surat Thani Hospital, Obstetric and Gynaecology Unit, Surat Thani 84000, Thailand)

Win Techakehakij (Medical Education Center, Surat Thani Hospital, Surat Thani, Thailand)

Background: A patient simulator, manikin, was commonly used in training medical students to perform cervical cancer screening, Pap smear, to maximize both students' clinical skill and patients' safety. However, the level of practicing skills required to achieve minimum competency in real patients is unknown. This study aims to explore the level of students' skills required during Pap smear training to ensure their minimum competency in real patients.

Summary of work: A longitudinal study was conducted in 29 sixth-year medical students who undertook the 8-week OB-GYN module at Suratthani hospital. A 30-minute training session, including lecture and procedural demonstration, was initiated on the first day of the module before letting students practice a Pap smear with a manikin. Students' skill in a manikin was

ABSTRACT BOOK: SESSION 3 MONDAY 26 AUGUST: 1045-1230

rated by a gynecologist, from 0(worst)-100(best). Afterward, students were allowed to do a Pap smear in real patients, with their performance being re-evaluated by the same staff. A simple linear regression analysis was applied to explore the relationship between manikin and patient scores.

Summary of results: Means of students' manikin and patient scores were 85.62(SD=10.02) and 80.79(SD=7.34), respectively. Statistical results reveal the manikin scores as a significant predictor of the patient scores (p-value<0.0005); the model to demonstrate the relationship is as follows: patient score = (manikin score x 0.649) + 25.13 (adjusted R-square=0.772). A manikin score of 85 is expected to achieve a minimal competency score of 80 in real patients.

Conclusions: A positive causal relationship between a Pap smear skill in simulation training and in real patients is indicated.

Take-home messages: Improving students' performance during simulation training could ensure their competency in real patients.

3BB/5

Application of in-situ high-fidelity simulation for "A-C-L-S (Airway-Circulation-Leadership-Support)" teamwork model training for healthcare providers during simulated cardiac arrests

Chih-Wei Yang (National Taiwan University Hospital, Department of Medical Education, No.7, Chung Shan S. Rd., Taipei 100, Taiwan)

Shih-Li Tsai (National Taiwan University Hospital, Department of Medical Education, Taipei, Taiwan) Yun-Yuan Chen (National Taiwan University Hospital, Department of Medical Education, Taipei, Taiwan) Chi-Chuan Yeh (National Taiwan University Hospital, Department of Medical Education, Taipei, Taiwan) Tzong-Shinn Chu (National Taiwan University Hospital, Department of Medical Education, Taipei, Taiwan) Shan-Chwen Chang (National Taiwan University Hospital, Department of Internal Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan)

Background: A model for resuscitation teamwork training called Airway-Circulation-Leadership-Support (A-C-L-S), comprising 4 domains: Airway (A), Circulation (C), Leadership (L), and Support (S), was developed and implemented. This study is to demonstrate the effectiveness of in-situ high-fidelity simulation (HFS) for A-C-L-S teamwork model training during simulated cardiac arrests.

Summary of work: Nursing staff in 6 general wards of National Taiwan University Hospital were all invited to attend the training courses. Trainees were randomly grouped into 4-5 persons for each HFS session (simulated cardiac arrest in a general ward). Each session lasted 10 minutes, followed by video-assisted debriefing. One month later, a second HFS session was arranged for each group. Assessments for each trainee, including 10-point-scale self-efficacy questionnaires

(Score S) and 10-point-scale teamwork global self-ratings (Score T), were used in both HFS sessions. Checklists of simulated performance (Score C) using 10-point scale were used to evaluate group performance during simulation sessions.

Summary of results: During May to July 2013, sixty nursing staff (total 14 groups) were included for training courses and assessments. Assessments for each trainee improved significantly after in-situ HFS training for A-C-L-S teamwork model (Score S 4.6 to 7.5 (p <0.001), and Score T 5.3 to 7.1 (p <0.001)). Resuscitation performance for each group during simulation also improved significantly (Score C 5.3 to 8.6 (p <0.001)). Conclusions: Application of in-situ HFS for A-C-L-S teamwork model training is an effective modality for resuscitation training in improving not only self-efficacy and teamwork self-ratings, but also group resuscitation performance.

Take-home messages: In-situ HFS is an effective training tool for resuscitation teamwork training.

3BB/6

Are biological simulators useful for competencies acquisition related to invasive procedures during undergraduate studies?

Maya Marini (Maimonides University, Medical School, Hidalgo 775 2° piso -, Jose Hernandez 2430, Buenos Aires 1426, Argentina)

Marcela Barrios (Maimonides University, Medical School, Buenos Aires, Argentina) Jorge Huerta (Maimonides University, Medical School, Buenos Aires, Argentina)

Santiago Ferrer (Maimonides University, Medical School, Buenos Aires, Argentina)

Julio Matz (Maimonides University, Medical School, Buenos Aires, Argentina)

Nicolas Locatelli (Maimonides University, Medical School, Buenos Aires, Argentina)

Background: The use of simulation at any educational field improves the learning perspectives for both teachers and students, and allows the development of objective and critical awareness. Summary of work: Primary objective: to carry out a comparison between two groups, with regard to the acquisition of skills and knowledge gained by medical students. The first group performed the practical training with biological simulators, while the second did not use a simulator. Secondary objective: to check if the senior medical students (5th year) obtain more benefit -due to the fact that they possess more medical knowledge - than the 4th year undergraduate medical students. Thirty-six students enrolled in fourth and fifth years of the medical career, Maimonides University (Universidad Maimonides, Buenos Aires, Argentina) were divided randomly in two groups to learn medical invasive procedures. They received theoretical and practical training in diagnostic peritoneal lavage, placing of tubes for pleural drainage, cricothyroid puncture and surgical cricotomy. One of the groups was trained with biological simulators. The theoretical and practical

ABSTRACT BOOK: SESSION 3 MONDAY 26 AUGUST: 1045-1230

learning was assessed by means of a written multiple choice examination, the practical assessment was made using a verification form OSCE (Objective Structured Clinical Examination).

Summary of results: The results show that the students in the group with procedural training using biological simulators attained better scores (statistically significant) than their counterparts without such training. These attributes of simulation-based education are consistent with models of effective educational interventions.

Conclusions: The virtual environment allows a learning that is difficult to achieve under normal circumstances; this is so because the trainees can work in a realistic and critical environment where they can develop skills in an instance very demanding from the cognitive perspective, and also emotionally compelling.

3BB/7

Do simulated performances correlate to subsequent clinical performances?

Mette Madsen (Juliane Marie Centre, Dept. of Obstetrics, Blegdamsvej 9, 2100 Copenhagen O, Denmark)

Lars Konge (Centre for Clinical Education, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark)

Страницы:
1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  30  31  32  33  34  35  36  37  38  39  40  41  42  43  44  45  46  47  48  49  50  51  52  53  54  55  56  57  58  59  60  61  62  63  64  65  66  67  68  69  70  71  72  73  74  75  76  77  78  79  80  81  82  83  84  85  86  87  88  89  90  91  92  93  94  95  96  97  98  99  100  101  102  103  104  105  106  107  108  109  110  111  112  113  114  115  116  117  118  119  120  121  122  123  124  125  126  127  128  129  130  131  132  133  134  135  136  137  138  139  140 


Похожие статьи

Автор неизвестен - 13 самых важных уроков библии

Автор неизвестен - Беседы на книгу бытие

Автор неизвестен - Беседы на шестоднев

Автор неизвестен - Богословие

Автор неизвестен - Божественность христа