Автор неизвестен - Mededworld and amee 2013 conference connect - страница 43

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4N/2

Effects of moderated and non-moderated online courses on student success

Marko Trtica (School of Medicine, Belgrade University, Department for Histology and Embryology "A.Dj. Kostic", Belgrade, Serbia)

Milica Borovic-Labudovic (School of Medicine, Belgrade University, Department for Histology and Embryology "A.Dj. Kostic", Belgrade, Serbia)

ABSTRACT BOOK: SESSION 4 MONDAY 26 AUGUST: 1400-1530

Nela Puskas (School of Medicine, Belgrade University, Department for Histology and Embryology "A.Dj. Kostic", Belgrade, Serbia)

Jelena Kostic (School of Medicine, Belgrade University, Department for Histology and Embryology "A.Dj. Kostic", Belgrade, Serbia)

Ivan Zaletel (School of Medicine, Belgrade University, Department for Histology and Embryology "A.Dj. Kostic", Belgrade, Serbia)

Milos Bajcetic (School of Medicine, Belgrade University, Department for Histology and Embryology "A.Dj. Kostic", Visegradska 26, Belgrade 11000, Serbia)

Background: Many previous studies showed that proper use of educational technology may improve performance of medical students. On the other side there is tendency to use "online courses" only as ordinary repositories of digital educational content with low level of interactions. The aim of this study is to investigate the performances in three groups of students who attended blended moderated, blended non-moderated and traditional course on histology. Summary of work: 589 first year medical students were randomly assigned to attend 3 types of histology course: classic (C; n=174 students), non-moderated blended course (N; n=190) and blended online course on histology (M; n=213). Online activities (lessons, quizzes and forums) were facilitated by moderators (teacher and teaching assistant) only in moderated course. Non-moderated course didn't have forums and that was main difference between N and M group. At the end of first semester all three groups took quiz composed of 30 multiple choice questions. Collected data were statistically analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis test. Summary of results: Average number of points on the quiz in K group was 11,60 ± 4.12, in N group 12,56 ± 4.34 and in M group 14,12 ± 5.18. Statistical analyses showed no differences between K and N group. On the other side students in M group showed statistically better results (p<0.01) than two other groups. Conclusions: Students who have attended a moderated blended course on histology have a higher level of knowledge retention, than students who attended classical and non-moderated online course. Take-home messages: Creating and moderating interaction in online courses is the essence of rich educational experience.

4N/3

Participants' Perceptions of a Massive Open Online Course

Jo-Anne Murray (University of Edinburgh, Royal (Dick)

School of Veterinary Studies, Easter Bush, Roslin,

Edinburgh EH25 9RG, United Kingdom)

Jayne Roberts (University of Edinburgh, Royal (Dick)

School of Veterinary Studies, Edinburgh, United

Kingdom)

Anne Stevenson (University of Edinburgh, Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies, Edinburgh, United Kingdom)

Joan Kulifay (University of Edinburgh, Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies, Edinburgh, United Kingdom)

Background: As their name suggest, MOOCs are open online courses that typically attract tens of thousands of participants, hence the word massive in their title. MOOCs are designed to be student-led with little input from the educator other than the provision of the learning materials. They are based on building connections, collaborations and resources between participants. There is limited information available on participants' perceptions of MOOCs. This study examined the perceptions of a group of participants registered on a MOOC in equine nutrition. Summary of work: A self-completion survey was designed to assess participants' perception of participating in a MOOC. There were 24,000 participants registered on the MOOC, which ran for a period of 5 weeks. A series of Likert scale questions were organised to gather students' perceptions of participating in the MOOC.

Summary of results: Ninety percent of respondents rated their overall MOOC experience as either excellent or very good, with many aspects of their MOOC either meeting or exceeding their expectations. The majority of participants also rated the MOOC learning materials as either excellent or very good. A substantially lower number (50 percent) of respondents rated the discussion fora as either excellent or very good, with even fewer (40 percent) rating their interactions with other participants on the course as excellent or very good.

Conclusions: Participants on this course rated the learning materials and overall MOOC experience very highly; however, further work is required to elucidate why a much lower percentage of participants held the interactions in less regard.

Take-home messages: This massive open online course was rated highly by the participants in terms of learning materials and content; however, peer interactions were considered to be less effective.

4N/4

An online case repository facilitates radiology residency training and evaluation of education theory, can potentially shorten duration of training, and aid mastery training - a follow up report

Poh-Sun Goh (National University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, 5 Lower Kent Ridge Road, Singapore 119074, Singapore)

Background: Arguably one of the greatest challenges for residency directors is ensuring consistency of clinical experience. It could also be argued that clinical expertise is based on a foundation of clinical case experience -both the variety and range of cases, and depth of case experience.

Summary of work: Digital case repositories have a role in facilitating radiology residency training by providing an accessible, reusable, hyperlinked collection of clinical

ABSTRACT BOOK: SESSION 4 MONDAY 26 AUGUST: 1400-1530

cases that mirror the full spectrum of clinical experience - from typical to atypical presentations, with confounding features, and multiple pathologies. We have organized our neuroradiology residency curriculum into thematic experiences, which are reflected in a defined collection of online cases over the last 2 years. These cases are presented via an online blog thematically, as unknown cases for quiz and drill exercises, and as a hyperlinked index for self-study. Summary of results: Our online neuroradiology case repository contains over 2000 cases, which reflect the breadth and depth of clinical experience for the most common, and less common but important conditions. This has been viewed over 25000 times in the last 2 years, with positive qualitative feedback. Quantitative testing using compare and contrast practice has shown the potential of using this online case repository to reduce residency duration. Evaluation of educational theory, and its application to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of training; and mastery training is facilitated by the availability of this online case repository.

Conclusions: An online case repository facilitates radiology residency training and evaluation of education theory, can potentially shorten duration of training, and aid mastery training.

Take-home messages: An online case repository facilitates radiology residency training and evaluation of education theory, can potentially shorten duration of training, and aid mastery training.

4N/5

The Evolution of a web based Distance Learning framework for vascular surgery - the first four years 2009-12

H Stepak (Poznan University of Medical Sciences,

Department of General and Vascular Surgery, 1/2 Dluga

Street, Poznan 61-848, Poland)

N Patelis (European Society for Vascular Surgery,

Education & Training Committee)

B Calinescu (European Society for Vascular Surgery,

Education & Training Committee)

SJ Matheiken (European Society for Vascular Surgery,

Education & Training Committee)

J Schmidli (European Society for Vascular Surgery,

Education & Training Committee)

J Beard (European Society for Vascular Surgery,

Education & Training Committee)

Background: An official e-learning website was authorized by the Education & Training Committee of the European Society for Vascular Surgery in 2008. vasculareducation.com was established in 2009 and further developed based on findings from an online needs analysis study among vascular surgeons and trainees in Europe.

Summary of work: We aimed to pioneer web-based learning methods to help European vascular surgeons achieve and maintain clinical competence. Summary of results: Over the past four years, vasculareducation.com has developed peer reviewed

multiple choice questions, blended learning modules to complement hands-on training workshops, online selections of European Society Annual Congress presentations, a collection of vascular surgical educational videos, an interactive online calendar of global vascular surgical events and an interactive instructional course in the use of OsiriX for 3D reconstruction of CT angiograms. Conclusions: The establishment of online resources for vascular surgeons is feasible and can be implemented successfully by full time clinicians and trainees. Take-home messages: The European Working Time Directive presently limits doctors to a 40 to 50-hour working week. The skills and knowledge that trainees must acquire has increased exponentially during this period, particularly in endovascular methods. This paradox has necessitates the application of new methods of learning to maintain clinical standards in vascular surgery.

4N/6

Database of medical images for development of teaching materials

Fernando Rafael Stahnke (Universidade Feevale, Instituto de Ciencias Exatas e Tecnologicas, Novo Hamburgo, Brazil)

Jonhy Rafael Eissmann (Universidade Feevale, Instituto de Ciencias Exatas e Tecnologicas, Novo Hamburgo, Brazil)

Marta Rosecler Bez (Universidade Feevale, Instituto de Ciencias Exatas e Tecnologicas, Novo Hamburgo, Brazil) Cecilia Dias Flores (UFCSPA - Univeridade Federal de Ciencias da Saude de Porto Alegre, Educagao e Informagao em Saude, Rua Sarmento Leite, 245 - Sala

412, Porto Alegre 90050-170, Brazil)

Background: A university with a focus on health care area generates a huge amount of images monthly that cannot be discarded, but must be fully exploited and made available for the use of teachers and students. In this regard, we have about 20,000 slides that are at risk of loss and damage.

Summary of work: This study presents the development of a system for storing and retrieving images using a Web-based platform in order to preserve the images and study cases, providing reusability, interoperability, modularity and ease for teachers and students of the institution. We developed a storage system and retrieval of images called SIAP (Anatomopathological System Images). The system allows the storage of images of slides, exams, X-rays, tomographies, magnetic resonance, etc, and movies.

Summary of results: Currently there are about 6,000 recovered slides images, properly classified and registered in the system. The prototype is being developed that includes algorithms such as adjusting brightness and contrast, binarization, and segmentation of region to highlight the regions of interest. Still, we developed a link to a PACs, enabling the use of Dicom images. Moreover, there are simulators like Virtual

patient (SIACC) that use stock photos for construction of clinical cases.

Conclusions: The system is in use by teachers in various areas such as pathology, colorectal, nephrology, etc. Based on more than one year of use of the system, adjustments are being made in order to get better control of data security, ease of use, information retrieval and integration with the PACs.

40 Workshop: Teaching Professionalism: Supporting the Development of a Professional Identity

Location: Meeting Room 3.5, PCC

Richard L Cruess (McGill University, Center for Medical Education, 1110 Pine Ave. W., Montreal H3A 1A3, Canada)

Sylvia R Cruess (McGill University, Center for Medical Education, Montreal, Canada) Linda Snell (McGill University, Center for Medical Education, Montreal, Canada)

Yvonne Steinert (McGill University, Center for Medical Education, Montreal, Canada)

Background: The approach to teaching medical professionalism has shifted because of the realization that the core issue is the development of a professional identity. It is proposed that teachers and learners must understand the nature of professional identity, the process through which this identity is developed by students and residents, and the factors which can positively or negatively Influence this evolving process. Individuals enter each phase of the journey from layperson to professional with an established identity that they must themselves alter as they successively become medical students, postgraduate trainees, and practitioners. This occurs through socialization and involves both compromise and negotiation on the part of learners, activities that can generate stress. It must also be recognized that the nature of the desired professional identity has changed as physicians are required to function in teams and be more accountable to society.

Intended outcomes: After the workshop, participants will be able to: describe the process of identity formation and socialization; factors that influence the process; and determine how and where the processes can be altered in order to assist learners in the development of their professional identities Structure of workshop: The literature will be briefly reviewed; a schematic representation of professional identity formation and socialization will be presented to assist participants in determining where it is possible to intervene to facilitate the process and in developing a plan for their own milieu. Small and large group discussions will be used to promote reflection and exchange.

Who should attend: Program directors, clinical teachers, faculty developers, and residents interested in teaching. Level: Intermediate

ABSTRACT BOOK: SESSION 4 MONDAY 26 AUGUST: 1400-1530

4P Workshop: Using the experience of others to manage the setting up of new medical schools or courses

Location: Meeting Room 4.1, PCC

John Cookson (Hull York Medical School, Centre for Education Development, HYMS, University of York, York YO10 5DD, United Kingdom)

David Pearson (Hull York Medical School, Centre for Education Development, York, United Kingdom) Peter McCrorie (St George's Medical School, Medical Education, London, United Kingdom)

Background: Not many set up a new medical school or course so they usually do it only once. Thus most have no previous experience to guide them. This workshop will help to share that experience. It is not concerned primarily with academic content (driven by community needs) but with the structure of the course and school and its relationships with stakeholders. Intended outcomes: Participants will have a greater understanding of the management issues in a new course or school and how experience elsewhere can assist in their resolution.

Structure of workshop: The workshop will use short plenary sessions at the start and finish with a small group format in between to discuss and share experience setting up new schools or courses. Facilitators will present a 'Menu' of issues to include: Identification of priorities for immediate attention Relationships with parent universities and co-ordination between university and health services Agreement of shared aims, ethos and pedagogy Attribution of 'ownership' of the course, Establishing sufficient facilities including appointing the

right staff

Assessment and constructive alignment Research and communication issues. Participants will select a small number to debate and share experience in groups. Each group will then feedback in a plenary session.

Who should attend: Those with responsibility for setting up new schools/courses and those starting work in them. They may have adapted the experience of others to their own situation. Level: Advanced

4Q Workshop: ASPIRE: Excellence in Medical Education

Location: Meeting Room 4.2, PCC David Wilkinson (Australia)

Trudie Roberts (University of Leeds, United Kingdom)

Background: Most medical schools in the developed world are under regular accreditation by national and/or regional accreditation bodies. The need has been expressed for another form of quality assurance and enhancement, recognising excellence, that rightly falls outside the formal accreditation process, and is the remit of professional education bodies. There is currently no mechanism at a global level for a professional peer review of excellence in medical education.

Intended outcomes: Raise awareness about this new global recognition program Brief medical schools interested in submitting an application for ASPIRE recognition Expand and improve an understanding about what excellence in medical education entails Structure: ASPIRE background and development What is 'excellence' in medical education, and how is ASPIRE different from accreditation? Details about the 3 initial areas selected for consideration:* Assessment Student engagement Social accountability and responsibility Facilitated group discussion ASPIRE process and timelines.

Who should attend: Representative of any medical school seeking to be among the first to achieve recognition for excellence in medical education. Level of workshop: Beginner.

ABSTRACT BOOK: SESSION 4 MONDAY 26 AUGUST: 1400-1530

4R Workshop: Continuing Medical Education and Professional Development: Designing Effective Short

Courses with Measurable Outcomes

Location: Meeting Room 2.2, PCC

Jocelyn Lockyer (University of Calgary, Dean's Office -Education, 3380 Hospital Dr NW, Calgary T2N 4Z6, Canada)

Joan Sargeant (Dalhousie University, Division of Medical Education, Halifax, Canada)

Karen Mann (Dalhousie University, Division of Medical Education, Halifax, Canada)

Lara Cooke (University of Calgary, Continuing Medical Education and Professional Development, Calgary, Canada)

Background: Systematic reviews of the literature demonstrate that short CME courses can result in changes to physician knowledge, skills, attitudes, and, if they are well designed, to physician behavior and potentially, patient and community outcomes. Specifically, CME and PD activities which include interactive components, multiple exposures, and require less complex behavioural changes appear to have the greatest likelihood of success. This workshop will explore the critical design elements needed for good outcomes and discuss approaches used to evaluate educational outcomes.

Intended outcomes: Following the workshop, participants will be able to (1) describe the CME and PD outcome literature as synthesized from systematic reviews, (2) identify approaches for determining the impact of an intervention or activity, (3) discuss their approaches to curriculum design and outcome measurement, (4) identify and plan for 2-3 techniques they intend to adopt to enhance their work. Structure of workshop: The workshop will model best practices in CME and PD short courses. We will begin with a case-based exercise and discussion in small groups. Brief presentations will follow about curriculum design, the CME and PD outcomes literature, selection of outcomes and approaches to measurement. Participants will then discuss the various approaches they might take to measuring 'planned' outcomes, using their own or provided examples. The final activity will involve both small and large group discussion of a case. Following a summary of the key content and discussion, participants will complete a 'commitment to change' questionnaire to identify the changes that they plan on return to their workplace.

Who should attend: Current and future CME and PD providers, designers and evaluators. Level: Intermediate

4S Workshop: Improving Clinical Reasoning Skills Using Simulation

Location: Meeting Room 3.1, PCC

James McGee (University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Laboratory for Educational Technology, Pittsburgh, United States)

Nancy Posel (McGill University, McGill Molson Medical Informatics, Montreal, Canada)

David Fleiszer (McGill University, McGill Molson Medical Informatics, Montreal, Canada)

Background: Clinical reasoning skills are critical to competency-based practice (Cook & Triola, 2009). Diverse theoretical frameworks, learning environments, and strategies have been proposed to support the development of clinical reasoning (Andersen, 2012; Bowen, 2006; Kassirer, 2010). One relatively new approach is using virtual patient (VP) simulation cases. These present an opportunity to actively engage learners; provide for critical analysis; encourage pattern recognition through deliberate practice; and allow immediate, continuous feedback - all features integral to the development of clinical reasoning skills (Bowen, 2006). This workshop will examine existing strategies for teaching clinical reasoning and provide participants with 'hands-on' opportunities to apply these to VPs. Intended outcomes: Participants will: Review theoretical frameworks and associated strategies to support teaching and assessment of clinical reasoning skills; Explore how these strategies can be integrated within VP cases; Apply these strategies to an example VP case; Present and discuss their results

Structure of workshop:

Introduction (30 minutes) - A short interactive plenary will provide an overview of clinical reasoning and suggested teaching strategies, followed by examples of their direct application within VP cases; Hands-on exercise (25 minutes) - Participants in facilitated small groups will integrate and apply clinical reasoning strategies to an example VP case; Group Presentations (25 minutes) - Representatives from the small groups will present and discuss their work; Wrap-up (10 minutes) - The whole group will discuss how VP cases can support knowledge transfer, acquisition, application and assessment of clinical reasoning skills. Who should attend: Educators interested in exploring how simulation in general, and VP cases specifically, can help support the development of clinical reasoning skills in their learners. Level: Introductory

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