Автор неизвестен - Mededworld and amee 2013 conference connect - страница 44

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4T Workshop: Using "Appreciative

Inquiry" to address Change Anxieties

Location: Meeting Room 3.2, PCC

M BrownellAnderson (NBME, International Programs, 3750 Market Street, Philadelphia 19104, United States) Hossam Hamdy (University of Sharjah College of Medicine, Sharjah, United Arab Emirates) Manuel Joao Costa (University of Minho, Medical Education, Minho, Portugal)

Background: Medical education is at the vortex of internal and external forces driving change. These forces extend from reports issued recently (Educating Physicians) and technology/team based instructional and assessment strategies to changes in postgraduate education to physicians in practice and maintenance of certification, all while health care systems/delivery models change as well. "Change anxiety" can be expressed in multiple ways from silence to "yes, but..." to asserting one was "never involved or told". Looking more deeply at this anxiety in medical education requires us to consider its impact on our human resources -faculty, staff, trainees - who must learn new skills, accept the loss of old roles, and/or reframe their identities as teachers/educators/scientists/clinicians. Organizations are now addressing change from an "asset perspective", seeking to identify and analyze what is working that is associated with the change effort - the successes. The methodology often used to elicit these assets is appreciative inquiry (AI). At the conclusion of the workshop participants will be able to: Describe the role that "change angst" can play in impeding or /advancing change; Apply leadership skills from Kotter and others to the medical education setting; Apply the identified success features to a current change effort at their home institution; Evaluate appreciative inquiry as an approach for identifying and managing change angst. Structure of workshop: Participants will work individually, in small groups, and in a large group using AI to identify the best strategies associated with addressing "change angst" and then apply these strategies to their home institution. Who should attend: Anyone experiencing change -junior faculty to senior administrator 4U Workshop: Building students' engagement: The design of teaching and

learning interventions

Location: Meeting Room 3.3, PCC

ADC Jaarsma (Academic Medical Centre, University of Amsterdam, Center for Evidence-Based Education, Meibergdreef 9, Amsterdam 1100 AZ, Netherlands) JW van den Berg (Academic Medical Centre, University of Amsterdam, Center for Evidence-Based Education, Amsterdam, Netherlands)

RA Scheepers (Academic Medical Centre, University of Amsterdam, Center for Evidence-Based Education, Professional Performance, Amsterdam, Netherlands) SS Lases (Academic Medical Centre, University of Amsterdam, Center for Evidence-Based Education, Professional Performance, Amsterdam, Netherlands) NJJM Mastenbroek (Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Quality improvement Veterinary Education, Utrecht, Netherlands)

Background: Engagement of students with their learning has a positive influence on their (academic) performances. Research, mostly from the domain of organizational and work psychology, has indicated several resources and motivational processes that may lead to more engaged learners and good academic and in-practice performances. This workshop aims to explore how theory on students' engagement can assist our understanding of the teaching and learning processes in medical education and what implications it may have for curriculum design.

Intended outcomes: Participants will understand the key concepts of students' engagement across the continuum from undergraduate medical students to lifelong learning medical professionals. Participants will develop a plan on how to incorporate these concepts in the design of teaching and learning interventions. Structure of workshop: The evidence for students' engagement will be briefly presented based on the Job Demands-Resources Model. Then, in small groups the participants will analyze the teaching and learning strategies of their own setting in relation to this model and will share their ideas on potential interventions. Examples of best practices will be shared. The workshop will be highly interactive, requiring participants to use the evidence and translate it to their educational practices

Who should attend: Educators/teachers designing teaching and learning exercises and program/course directors responsible for teaching and learning in undergraduate and postgraduate medical educational domain.

Level: Intermediate

ABSTRACT BOOK: SESSION 4 MONDAY 26 AUGUST: 1400-1530

4V Workshop: Developing national assessment processes: satisfying community and regulator concerns about standards while maintaining and improving the quality of medical education systems. (reason for the change is that diversity is not a goal in itself, it is only useful if it serves a quality purpose)

Location: Room A, Holiday Inn

RB Hays (Bond University, Gold Coast, Australia) L Schuwirth (Flinders University, Adelaide, Australia) on behalf of Medical Deans Australia and New Zealand

Background: Many countries share a common medical education, assessment and qualifications frameworks and standards. Also in many countries there has been a recent expansion of basic medical education. In Australia, for example, there are now 20 medical schools with diverse curriculum approaches. These schools are all producing graduates who will have to provide the future medical workforce for not only the own nation, but also the global market. Many countries have no common benchmark exit assessment process and others do. In many parts of the world some observers would like a 'national board' style examination, while others argue that this would harm curriculum diversity. There is apparently no single best answer that would satisfy all countries and all situations, but there are a large number of useful considerations. Intended outcomes: Better understanding of the potential methods for national assessment processes that share resources; Better understanding of the various factor influencing the decisions on national assessment and testing and their weights; Better understanding of how to address both 'guaranteed minimal standard' expectations and 'learning for the future' arguments;

Structure of workshop: Learning activities: (ideal for 15­25 participants); Group introductions; Brief introduction by presenters (15 minutes); Small groups of 5-6 to discuss de-identified case scenarios (45 minutes); Reporting back key points to whole group (20 minutes); Wrap up / summary of key issues (10 minutes). Who should attend: While the topic is of particular interest currently to Australian and New Zealand medical educators, educators from other jurisdictions are particularly welcome to broaden the debate and share expertise and practice.

4W Workshop: Can I say that? Negotiating Insider/Outsider Boundaries in Critical Health Professions Education Research

Location: Room B, Holiday Inn

Saleem Razack (McGill University, Pediatrics, 2300 Rue Tupper, C 807, Montreal H3H1P3, Canada) Tina Martimianakis (University of Toronto, Pediatrics, Toronto, Canada)

Cynthia Whitehead (University of Toronto, Family Medicine, Toronto, Canada)

Ayelet Kuper (University of Toronto, Internal Medicine, Toronto, Canada)

Background: Health professions education research is increasingly serving as a contact zone between disparate scholarly traditions. Quantitative approaches now collide creatively with qualitative approaches, both as separate analyses of the same phenomenon of study or combined within the same study to produce mixed methods research. While objectivity is a core value of quantitative methods, considerations of subjectivity, inter-subjectivity and researcher positioning are important in the undertaking of critical qualitative research. As such, researchers' critical reflexivity into their own positioning vis-a-vis the phenomenon of study, as either within a health professions community or outside of one, becomes important in the assessment of research rigor.

Intended outcomes: The authors have designed a workshop in which participants will consider the following questions with respect to researcher positioning in critical research: When one engages in critical work, how does one negotiate the tension between seeking to persuade an "audience" to change practices and remaining true to the critical theory used?

Is it possible to be critical with positioning that is "on the inside"?

What constitutes scholarly and rigorous research in this context?

The goal of this workshop is to create a space for health professions education critical researchers to engage in rich discussion around these questions, and to learn from each others' experiences. Structure of workshop: Mini-plenary (15 minutes); Critical health professions education research case studies (30 minutes); Lessons learned from participants own experiences (30 minutes); Wrap-up: rigorous critical research and positioning (15 minutes) Who should attend: Persons involved in critical health professions research Level: Intermediate

ABSTRACT BOOK: SESSION 4 MONDAY 26 AUGUST: 1400-1530

4X Workshop: Motivational teaching practices: Choose between filling the bucket and lighting the fire

Location: Room D, Holiday Inn

Rashmi Kusurkar (Institute for Education and Training, VU University Medical Center Amsterdam, VUmc School of Medical Sciences, Post Bus 7057, Amsterdam 1007MB, Netherlands)

Olle ten Cate (University Medical Center Utrecht, Center for Research and Development of Education, Utrecht, Netherlands)

Larry Gruppen (University of Michigan Medical School, Department of Medical Education, Ann Arbor, United

States)

Anthony Artino, Jr. (Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, United States)

Background: Motivation forms an essential component of the learning process and influences academic performance. Motivation is dynamic and teachers can play an important role in stimulating student motivation, both at the situational level (i.e. for a situation, e.g. a learning session) and at a contextual level (i.e. for a context, e.g. medical study). Understanding contemporary theories of motivation can help medical educators formulate practical tips on stimulating student motivation. Intended outcomes: Participants are able to: Discuss the concept of motivation in relation to Self-determination theory (SDT), Social-cognitive theory (SCT) and Attributions and Self-theories; Formulate concrete tips for stimulating student motivation. Structure of workshop: Introduction of organizers, workshop and participants and setting the stage for motivation -10 min. Introduction to SDT, SCT and Attribution and self-theories - 30 min. Activity One - 20 min. Procedure: In groups of 6 participants each, 2 participants assume the role of students, two assume the role of teachers and two assume the role of moderators. Students propose the changes that can be made, teachers talk about the practical difficulties and moderators try to reach a workable solution. Each group comes up with one concrete tip for stimulating student motivation. Activity Two - 20 min. Procedure: Interactive discussion within the bigger group on the tips developed by the smaller groups. Critical reflection by the workshop presenters on the practicality of the tips. Summary, key messages and reflection - 10 min. Who should attend: Teachers, teaching coordinators, curriculum developers, medical students. 4Y Meet The Expert: Hilliard Jason

Location: Meeting Room 4.3, PCC

Hilliard Jason (University of Colorado, Denver, USA)

As his contribution to our plenary symposium on The Medical School of the Future, Hilliard ("Hill") Jason, MD, EdD will be revealing for the first time to a public audience the thinking behind a proposed new (and new kind of) medical school. It is intended to be a multi-campus, international graduate medical school that will begin as a self-sustaining, UK-based charity, founded on the latest findings of educational and brain sciences, and optimally responsive to current and future healthcare needs. A key plan for this new school is that its dominant faculty scholarship activities will be the pursuit of systematic innovation and research in medical education. The goal is to secure endowment funds to support multi-institutional, multi-national collaboration in the pursuit of the kind of large-scale data gathering and analysis that have become increasingly important in clinical research. Hill is hoping that you will join this session to question and challenge any of the propositions he will have introduced in the Symposium, and to explore together the possibilities of future, large-scale research in medical education.

4Z Posters: Student in Difficulty/Student Support

Location: South Hall, PCC 4Z/1

Evaluation of The Maslach Burnout Inventory And Coping Styles Among Second-Year Medical Students

Fernando Villegas Alvarez (Universidad Nacional Autonoma De Mexico, Cirugia, Circuito Interior Ciudad Universitaria. Av. Insurgentes Sur 3700, Ciudad de Mexico DF 04530, Mexico)

Rosa Maria Diaz-Romero (Universidad Tecnologica De Mexico, Coordinacion De Investigacion. Facultad De Odontologia, Mexico Df, Mexico) Manuel Alfonso Villalobos Huerta (Universidad Nacional Autonoma De Mexico, Cirugia, Mexico Df, Mexico) Claudia Lopez- Becerra (Universidad Pedagogica Nacional-Mexico, Psicologia Educativa, Mexico Df, Mexico)

Background: Burnout (B) is a term used to imply a state of exhaustion, being literally "burned out" (Gil 2005). Medical students enroll in a demanding process of academic and clinical education. Faced with stressful situations, humans develop psychological responses or reactions that are defensive and beneficial for their well-being and survival. They implement these adaptive responses in their confrontations with stressors in the environment in order to moderate the impact of stressful life events (Lazarus, Folkman 1991). Summary of work: Objective: To measure the frequency of B and its association with Coping Styles (CS) among second-year medical students at the UNAM. Methodology: Informed consent was obtained from a sample of 300 of 1140 medical students enrolled in the Medicine School, for this descriptive, prospective, analytic study. Mean age/years 20.1 ± 1.37, 65% were females, 7% were studying and working at the same time. The Characteristic CS (Lopez, Rivera, Garcia, and Sanchez 2009) and the Maslach Burnout Inventory evaluated the presence of different components of B

(Schaufell 2002).

Summary of results: Evidence for B was found in 19% of these students, being more frequent among the females, the evening students, and those who studied and worked at the same time (p>0.05). Means for components of B were: Exhaustion 2.63 ± 1.24 (moderately high), Cynicism 1.29 ± 1.09 (moderately high), Personal Efficacy 4.30 ± 0.91 (moderately low). The predominant CS among these subjects was Planned Self-Affirmation.

Conclusions: Burnout was found in 19% of these student subjects, being more frequent among females. The main CS employed was Planned Self-Affirmation. Take-home messages: Burnout was found in 19% of these students.

ABSTRACT BOOK: SESSION 4 MONDAY 26 AUGUST: 1400-1530

4Z/2

The use of psychoactive substances among medical students. A quantitative and qualitative research

Alexandre Roberti (Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade Federal de Goias, Clinica Medica, Rua L n° 53, apto 501 Setor Oeste, Edificio Pitangueiras, Goiania 74.120-050, Brazil)

Mariely Fernanda da Silva (Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade Federal de Goias, Academica, Goiania, Brazil)

Synara Escobar Moreira (Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade Federal de Goias, Academica, Goiania, Brazil)

Vanuza Maria Rosa (Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade Federal de Goias, Academica, Goiania, Brazil)

Maria do Rosario Ferraz Roberti (Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade Federal de Goias, Clinica Medica, Goiania, Brazil)

Nilce MSC Costa (Faculdade de Nutrigao da Universidade Federal de Goias, Pos-graduagao, Goiania, Brazil)

Background: The growing consumption of psychoactive substances (PAS) is of particular importance to society given the magnitude of the phenomenon and the personal and social consequences it represents. Throughout students this is associated with a more intense social life and easy access to PAS. We are pursuing the causes for the high prevalence of these substances, particularly for the medical students. In order to contribute with actions for prevention and intervention, we are researching and establishing the factors that lead to the usage of PAS, to ensure the best professional training.

Summary of work: The study is both qualitative and quantitative. A number of 180/660 medical students (1st to 6th grade) took a survey, of these, 16 participated in two focus groups.

Summary of results: Analyzing consumed alcohol, 34% of the surveyed drink 2 to 3 times per week, 47% preferred beer and 31% vodka, 57.5% take 3-4 doses each time, 5% binge drink once a week and 10,5% once a month. The most expressive testimonies of qualitative stage were: "the group's influence is the key." "If you're in a group that uses any drugs, certainly you'll have to use it to bond." "Drug use is always related with those around you."

Conclusions: Consumption of PAS has a high popularity among medical students, mainly because of the influence of the social circle.

Take-home messages: A psychological support would be important for the continued health of the student's community along with the work on prevention and assistance to users of PAS.

4Z/3

Burnout in Medical Students: A randomized multicentric study

Munique Almeida (School of Medicine of the University of Sao Paulo, Center for Development of Medical Education, Av. Dr. Arnaldo, 455, Av.Nossa Senhora do 6, 423, Sao Paulo, Brazil)

Helena Paro (School of Medicine of the University of Sao Paulo, Center for Development of Medical Education, Sao Paulo, Brazil)

Fernanda B Mayer (School of Medicine of the University of Sao Paulo, Center for Development of Medical Education, Sao Paulo, Brazil)

Milton A Martins (School of Medicine of the University of Sao Paulo, Center for Development of Medical Education, Sao Paulo, Brazil)

Paulo SP Silveira (School of Medicine of the University of Sao Paulo, Center for Development of Medical Education, Sao Paulo, Brazil)

Patricia Tempski (School of Medicine of the University of Sao Paulo, Center for Development of Medical Education, Sao Paulo, Brazil)

Background: Burnout has been recently associated with unprofessional behavior among medical students. We aimed to assess burnout among Brazilian medical students.

Summary of work: Multi-centric study with 1,350 randomized medical students from all years of Medical School. Participants answered the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) in an electronic survey platform. We compared burnout scores according to gender and year of medical school (grouped as follows: G1 - first and second years; G2 - third and fourth years; G3 - fifth and sixth years).

Summary of results: Response rate was 81.2% (n=1,350). We observed scores suggestive of burnout in 84% of students. Female students had higher emotional exhaustion (EE) scores (p<0.001). Males had higher depersonalization (DP) scores (p<0.001). G3 students had higher scores on EE, DP and personal accomplishment (PA) than G1 and G2 students (p<

0.001).

Conclusions: We observed higher exhaustion among female students and higher depersonalization among males. Depersonalization was highest in final years of Medical School.

Take-home messages: Observing higher depersonalization among students with higher personal accomplishment is intriguing. This could be explained by the "hardening of the heart" some medical educator claim to exist throughout medical school. Further studies are necessary to explore this finding.

4Z/4

Prevalence of psychological problems in Lampang medical students, 2 years follow up

Thawanrat Srichan (Lampang Medical Education Center, Psychiatry Department, Lampang Hospital, Lampang

52000, Thailand)

ABSTRACT BOOK: SESSION 4 MONDAY 26 AUGUST: 1400-1530

Background: Six years medical curriculum may cause stresses such as interpersonal relationship, coping strategies and evaluation methods. Early detection and early intervention can help medical students cope with their stressors in order to ensure good quality of their learning.

Summary of work: This descriptive study aimed to collect data from 134 medical students in clinical years between 2009-2012. Medical students with problems were followed up for two years. The problems were identified and classified. During these two years of study, there were psychological interventions. Summary of results: Out of 134 medical students, 20 medical students (14.9%) had many problems. The problem areas were divided into interpersonal relationship, educational problems and psychiatric problems. Psychiatric problems were focused and identified. Six medical students were diagnosed and classified into anxiety disorder, depressive disorder and bipolar disorder. After two years of follow-up, only two medical students were in need of continued treatment. Conclusions: Early detection and early intervention are very important processes in order to help and care for medical students in educational programs. Especially psychiatric problems should be attended to and followed up.

Take-home messages: Psychological problems or psychiatric issues should be evaluated regularly. Psychological interventions are a good thing that ought to be done in the future.

4Z/5

Response Style and Academic Performance: implications for student support

Pirashanthie Vivekananda-Schmidt (University of Sheffield, Medical Education, Sheffield Medical School, BeechHill Road, Sheffield S10 2RX, United Kingdom) John Sandars (University of Leeds, Medical Education, Leeds, United Kingdom)

Background: Response style is key to how individuals effectively cope when they encounter stressful or challenging situations. Previous research suggests that individuals who score low on reflective style, but high on over - absorption or action, make less effective use of coping strategies. No previous studies in academic performance have been identified. AIM: We investigated whether student response style will predict their exam performance across academic domains. Summary of work: One hundred and six five Sheffield medical students in years 1 and 2 participated in the study. With consent, participant scores on the validated "Reflective Activity Scale" were tested against their formative (two assessments) and summative (three assessments) grades.

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