Автор неизвестен - Mededworld and amee 2013 conference connect - страница 59

Страницы:
1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  30  31  32  33  34  35  36  37  38  39  40  41  42  43  44  45  46  47  48  49  50  51  52  53  54  55  56  57  58  59  60  61  62  63  64  65  66  67  68  69  70  71  72  73  74  75  76  77  78  79  80  81  82  83  84  85  86  87  88  89  90  91  92  93  94  95  96  97  98  99  100  101  102  103  104  105  106  107  108  109  110  111  112  113  114  115  116  117  118  119  120  121  122  123  124  125  126  127  128  129  130  131  132  133  134  135  136  137  138  139  140 

Conclusions: IMG fellows and supervisors in Psychiatry and Surgery had differing perceptions on fellow training needs. Moreover, IMG fellow needs could be re-classified using Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs, which provided a framework for understanding IMG performance.

Take-home messages: Frameworks rooted in trainee needs can be useful in early identification of IMG training issues. Orientation curricula and early support are important to IMG adaptation to training and enhancing success.

5L/5

Using the Erasmus Framework to build a European medical Curriculum: A first step, the JPEMs Program

Vincent Procaccio (University of Angers, Dean's Office, Angers, France)

Tamara Matysiak-budnik (University of Nantes, International Relation Office, Nantes, France) Ferenc Bari (University of Szeged, International Relation Office, Szeged, Hungary)

Henke Groenewegen (Amsterdam VU University, Amsterdam, Netherlands)

Anca Buzoianu (University Iuliu Hatieganu, Dean's Office, Cluj-Napoca, Romania)

Isabelle Richard (University of Angers, Dean's Office, Rue haute de reculee, Angers 49000, France)

Background: Medical students meet difficulties in obtaining the acknowledgement of a period of study abroad. Erasmus exchanges allow the students to discover other countries and health systems but the academic added value is sometimes debatable. Summary of work: Seven medical schools (Angers and Nantes, France; Amsterdam VU University, Netherlands; Cluj-Napoca and Timisoara, Romania; Szeged, Hungary; Napoli Secunda University, Italy) have built a full semester intended for second or third year MS, (the Joint Program of European Medical Studies -JPEMS). Summary of results: Content: 6 modules (Physiopathology, Immunology, Micro-biology, Genetics, Medical English and Medical Informatics) + a full time placement in a research laboratory of five weeks. JPEMS was organised in Angers in 2011, Nantes in 2012, and will take place in Angers in 2013 and Szeged in 2014. It is fully credited in the home curricula for all students. Teaching is provided by academics from the different universities (13 visiting academic staff) in English, for a group of 38 in 2011. Introduction into research was the main motivation of 20% of the students; 90% of the

students rated the program as good or very good; The proposals of the students to improve the program were: less lectures, more handouts and teaching material, better coordination to avoid redundancy. The tutorials and practical sessions were best evaluated. Conclusions: This experience shows that it is possible to share some bricks of the medical curriculum between European universities. The journey towards double diploma in medicine remains long and the obstacles due to national regulations and language barriers are significant.

5M Short Communications: Selection:

Situational Judgement Test

Location: Club D, PCC

5M/1

Assessing non-academic attributes for medical and dental school admissions using a Situational Judgement Test

Maire Kerrin (Work Psychology Group, 27 Brunel

Parkway, Pride Park, Derby DE24 8HR, United Kingdom)

Fiona Patterson (Work Psychology Group & University of

Cambridge, Derby, United Kingdom)

Rachel Greatrix (UKCAT Consortium, Nottingham, United

Kingdom)

Sandra Nicholson (UKCAT Consortium, London, United Kingdom)

Background: Applicants to UK university medical and dental schools are of a consistently high calibre with regards to their academic qualifications. The UK Clinical Aptitude Test (UKCAT) is used by a consortium of universities to help them make more informed choices from amongst the many highly qualified applicants who apply for the medical and dental degree programmes. The UKCAT currently consists of tests of verbal, quantitative and abstract reasoning, as well as a decision making analysis test. A newly designed situational judgement test (SJT) was piloted as a selection method to evaluate important non-academic attributes deemed appropriate in medical and dental students as part of

the UKCAT.

Summary of work: The SJT targets three domains: integrity, perspective taking and team-involvement. Test content was developed by medics and dentists (N=38) and experienced psychometricians (N=5). 18 test forms were piloted, and each test form contained 13 scenarios. Each scenario asked applicants to rate between 4 and 6 response options and two formats of rating scales (1 to 4 scale) were used; very appropriate to not appropriate at all, and very important, to not important at all. The SJT pilot was completed on-line alongside the other UKCAT tests. A total of 25, 431 applicants sat the pilot.

Summary of results: Initial results show the SJT to have good levels of reliability (a=.75-.85). Initial evidence of criterion-related validity was established as applicant scores on the SJT correlated significantly with the other UKCAT tests. On average, the SJT correlated more strongly with the verbal and decision making analysis test than with the numerical and abstract tests. Conclusions: An SJT is a reliable and valid selection methodology for testing important non-academic attributes for entry to medical and dental school. Take-home messages: An SJT is a reliable and valid selection methodology for testing important non-academic attributes for entry to medical and dental school.

ABSTRACT BOOK: SESSION 5 MONDAY 26 AUGUST: 1600-1730

5M/2

Design of a new Situational Judgement Test (SJT) to assess the professional attributes of UK junior doctors

Fiona Patterson (Work Psychology Group, Pride Park, Derbyshire, United Kingdom) Vicki Ashworth (Work Psychology Group, Derbyshire, United Kingdom)

Siobhan Fitzpatrick (Medical Schools Council, London, United Kingdom)

Kim Walker (UK Foundation Programme Office, Cardiff, United Kingdom)

David Good (University of Cambridge, Psychology, Cambridge, United Kingdom)

Background: Having completed medical school training, students apply for a junior doctor post as part of the UK Foundation Training Programme. It was recommended that alongside an educational performance measure, an SJT was implemented to assess relevant professional attributes (eg integrity, teamwork) to replace the open-ended competency-based application form. Summary of work: This project describes the design, piloting (N=1094) and analysis of an operational SJT for selection of approximately 8,000 medical students in 2013, including a job analysis to identify the professional attributes expected of Foundation training doctors. Summary of results: Psychometric analysis provided evidence that the SJT is a reliable measurement methodology in this context and overall is able to differentiate between candidates. Early evidence was found for criterion-related validity. Feedback indicated that candidates felt that the SJT was relevant and fair. Conclusions: The SJT is a reliable and valid methodology to facilitate the appointment of junior doctors to the 2013 Foundation Programme. Take-home messages: A robustly designed SJT will enhance the predictive validity of the selection process and improve standardisation nationally. SJTs draw on non-cognitive attributes that cannot easily be targeted through traditional exams and reflect the challenging interpersonal context that junior doctors work within.

5M/3

Reliable Pre-interview Selection of Domestic and International Post-graduate Candidates: Computer-based Situational Judgment Testing

Kelly L Dore (McMaster University, Program for Educational Research & Development/Medicine, MDCL 3520 1200 Main Street W, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4L8, Canada)

Brad Petrisor (McMaster University, Orthopedics, Hamilton, Canada)

Michelle Ghert (McMaster University, Orthopedics, Hamilton, Canada)

Moyez Ladhani (McMaster University, Pediatrics, Hamilton, Canada)

Harold Reiter (McMaster University, PERD, Hamiltonn, Canada)

Sharyn Kreuger (McMaster University, PERD, Hamilton, Canada)

Background: Most post-graduate training candidates are excluded at the pre-interview stage without benefit of personal/professional qualities assessment. Can Computer-based Assessment for Sampling Personal Characteristics (CASPer), successful in undergraduate admissions, be a useful pre-interview screen for domestic and international (IMG) post-graduate applicants on intrinsic CanMEDS roles? Summary of work: All domestic and IMG applicants to the Orthopaedic and IMGs to Paediatrics training programs at McMaster completed CASPer as part of their pre-interview process. CASper, completed online, consists of 12 sections (eight video-based and 4 self-descriptive), on various intrinsic roles. Applicants have 5 minutes to type responses to 3 follow up questions/section.

Summary of results: 162/178 (Ortho) and 213/281 (Peds) completed CASPer as part of pre-interview selection. Mean CASPer scores in Ortho differed significantly between domestic (3.85) and IMG (2.7, p <.001) applicants. Peds IMG scores were similar (mean = 3.0). However, there was considerable overlap in CASPer scores with similar maximum average scores for IMGs (5.25) and domestic (5.08) applicants. The overall test reliability for CASPer was 0.84. Overall reliability for domestic was lower (G = 0.65) compared to international applicants (G = 0.85, 0.77 for orthopaedics and pediatrics respectively).

Conclusions: While overall test reliability is very good for CASPer in general, results in the more homogeneous domestic applicant pool were lower. Long-term predictive validity and diversity issues need to be addressed.

Take-home messages: Initial results indicate that CASPer demonstrates potential as a feasible and reliable measure of personal/professional characteristics in the pre-interview assessment of post-graduate applicants.

5M/4

Can a Situational Judgement Test (SJT) measure cognitive aspects of communication skills for shared decision making in medicine and teaching education?

Claudia Kiessling (Klinikum der Universitat Munchen, Lehrstuhl fur Didaktik und Ausbildungsforschung in der Medizin, Ziemssenstr. 1, Munich 80331, Germany) Martin R Fischer (Klinikum der Universitat Munchen, Lehrstuhl fur Didaktik und Ausbildungsforschung in der Medizin , Munich, Germany)

Background: There is an ongoing discussion to what extent written or computer-based assessment formats can assess communication skills especially in the early years of undergraduate training in medicine and in teaching education.

Summary of work: We created different learning modules to train students' communication skills for shared decision making (SDM). To assess the

ABSTRACT BOOK: SESSION 5 MONDAY 26 AUGUST: 1600-1730

effectiveness of the modules, we developed two encounters with standardized patients (SPs) and a computer-based test (CBT). We compared three different training conditions experimentally against a control group. Testing time for the CBT was 30 minutes. The SJT consisted of eight vignettes with one to two MCQs each (15 questions) plus seven questions with context-poor stimulus. Tests for medical and for teaching students were adapted to their professional context but had the same structure. Summary of results: 72 medical students and 96 teaching students took part in the study. In the CBT, mean scores were 15.5 points (max. 22 points) for medical students and 12.8 point for teaching students. Item difficulty ranged from 32% to 94%. Cronbach's a was .590 for "medicine" and .368 for "teaching". Cronbach's a was lower for the SJT part than for the context poor questions. Differences for the training conditions and correlations between CBT and SP encounters will be analysed. Conclusions: Our SJT did not reach an acceptable reliability. Questions with context-poor stimulus questions increased a but their validity is debatable. Take-home messages: Further steps of validation are needed to support the SJT to assess cognitive aspects of communication skills.

5M/5

Video based Situational Judgement Test Of Social Competencies In Medical Student Selection

Janine Kahmann (Medizinische Fakultat Heidelberg, Studierendenauswahl, Im Neuenheimer Feld 155, Heidelberg 69120, Germany) Martina Kadmon (Medizinische Fakultat Heidelberg, Studierendenauswahl, Heidelberg, Germany)

Background: A video based situational judgment test (SJT), measuring 6 essential social competencies relevant for undergraduate medical education (self-discipline, self-reflection, respect towards others, the ability to criticise and accept criticism, searching for appropriate support and the ability to establish contact with others), was developed at the Medical Faculty of Heidelberg in 2012/2013 and will be integrated as a voluntary online-self-assessment in medical student selection.

Summary of work: From May to July 2013 applicants to the Medical Faculty of Heidelberg will be asked to participate in the SJT that will comprise 25 situations of challenging social interactions that typically occur in undergraduate medical training. Participants will also be asked for the grade of their university entrance qualification (Abitur), their Medical Aptitude Test-score (TMS), the self-assessment of their social competencies and the acceptance of the SJT. Summary of results: Results of factor structure, correlations with cognitive criteria (university entrance qualification, TMS-score), social criteria (questionnaire for social competencies) and acceptance of the SJT will be presented at the AMEE conference.

Conclusions: A further validation-study involving undergraduate medical students is planned, that will test correlations with intelligence, personality, grades of undergraduate medical study and achievement motivation.

5N Short Communications: Teaching and Learning: Team Based Learning

Location: Meeting Room 2.1, PCC

5N/1

Team-based learning (TBL) is effective in the education of geriatric medicine

Eiji Kaneko (Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Center for Education Research in Medicine and Dentistry, 1-5-45 Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8510, Japan) Kenji Toyoshima (Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Department of Geriatrics and Vascular Medicine, Tokyo, Japan)

Yasuko Abe (Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Department of Geriatrics and Vascular Medicine, Tokyo, Japan)

Masashi Beppu (Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Center for Education Research in Medicine and Dentistry, Tokyo, Japan)

Kentaro Shimokado (Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Department of Geriatrics and Vascular Medicine, Tokyo, Japan)

Nobuo Nara (Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Center for Education Research in Medicine and Dentistry, Tokyo, Japan)

Background: Team-based learning (TBL) is an effective method for students to learn through discussion. Evaluation of students can also be performed at the same time. We used TBL for geriatric education and analyzed the difference between TBL and lectures. Summary of work: Two TBL sessions were performed for the 4th year and one for the 5th year medical students during a lecture-TBL series of geriatric education. Students filled out questionnaires after each TBL and lecture. The scores of TBL and the final examination were analyzed and compared to traditional lecture series.

Summary of results: Overall evaluation of TBL by the questionnaire was similar to lectures (81.9 vs. 81.7). Although some students pointed out they were not used to clickers, many students thought TBL made them think thoroughly about subjects during small group discussions. Scores of final examination were better after lecture-TBL series compared to traditional lecture series (78.6 vs. 74.2, p<0.05), whereas the correlation between scores of TBL and final examination was low

(r=0.27).

Conclusions: Although overall evaluation of TBL by questionnaire was similar to lectures, many students found TBL to be more effective through small group discussions and the score of the final examination was better after TBL. TBL score might be a different parameter from final examination since the correlation between them was not good. Take-home messages: TBL seems to be an effective method for students to learn through discussion, but more study needs to be done to decide how to use the TBL score.

ABSTRACT BOOK: SESSION 5 MONDAY 26 AUGUST: 1600-1730

5N/2

The Team-based learning improves students' performances at the Undergraduate Nursing Course

Annalisa Raso (University of Turin, Undergraduate Nursing Course, via Santena 5/bis, Torino 10124, Italy) Lorenza Garrino (University of Turin, Undergraduate Nursing Course, Turin, Italy)

Carlo Ruffinengo (University of Turin, Undergraduate Nursing Course, Turin)

Laura Cominetti (University of Turin, Undergraduate Nursing Course, Turin, Italy)

Fulvio Ricceri (University of Turin, Biotechnology, Turin,

Italy)

Valerio Dimonte (University of Turin, Undergraduate Nursing Course, Turin, Italy)

Background: Team-based learning (TBL) is a teaching methodology that fosters active participation in the classroom and encourages critical thinking, however, it has rarely been applied to nursing education. The aim is to implement TBL and assess its impact on nursing students and the repercussions on exam performances. Summary of work: in the 2010/2011 academic year, first-year students engaged in 5 TBL sessions at the Undergraduate Nursing Course of the University of Turin. The subject taught was General Nursing Principles and Basic Care I. The level of satisfaction was evaluated by means of a questionnaire. The training impact was measured by comparing the examination performances with those recorded in the previous year, i.e.

2009/2010.

Summary of results: the TBL was tested by 207 students and 199 (97%) questionnaires were collected. The students remarked that TBL is an engaging methodology and 84% wished to extend its use to other subjects as well. The students' exam performances improved significantly (p = 0.0003).

Conclusions: TBL proved to be a popular teaching method among students and helped improve their exam performances. The results are limited to first implementation experience. Take-home messages: Use of TBL applied to Nurse Education should be encouraged and results should be registered through the years.

5N/3

Team-based learning and its influence on competencies and teamwork related attitudes of medical students: a pilot study

Marianne Giesler (University of Freiburg, Centre for Evaluation of Teaching in Medicine Baden-Wuerttemberg, Elsaesser Str. 2m, Freiburg 79110, Germany)

Peter Bruestle (University of Freiburg, Centre for Evaluation of Teaching in Medicine Baden-Wuerttemberg, Freiburg, Germany) Meike Jost (University of Freiburg, Department of Neurology, Freiburg, Germany)

Angela Schickler (University of Freiburg, Centre for Evaluation of Teaching in Medicine Baden-Wuerttemberg, Freiburg, Germany) Jochen Brich (University of Freiburg, Department of Neurology, Freiburg, Germany)

Background: Team-based learning (TBL) seems to be a good method in order to achieve greater learning success and a better understanding in medicine. In this pilot study we explored whether specific competencies of medical students and their attitudes towards teamwork can be influenced by this method. Summary of work: We conducted a TBL-seminar in Neurology with 17 third year students and a traditional seminar with 22 students. Participants responded to statements regarding their expertise in Neurology (6 items), their learning competencies (4 items) and their attitudes about team work (6 items). Data were collected at the first and/or the last session of the TBL and the traditional seminar. Data were analyzed by t-tests comparing means between as well as within groups.

Summary of results: We found no significant differences between the two groups in the last session of the seminars regarding the learning competencies, but a significant difference in self-rated neurological expertise (M(TBL) = 4.85 vs. M(SEM) = 4.14, p = .036, Cohen's d = 0.8). In addition, we found a significant increase in positive attitude towards teamwork within the TBL-group (e.g. M(T1) = 3.42 vs. M(T2) = 4.25, Cohen's d =

1.04).

Conclusions: The results of this pilot study point to the possibility that students' medical expertise and attitudes about working in teams may be altered through team-based learning-activities. Starting in April 2013, the main study will test this hypothesis by means of an experimental cross-over design with approximately 160 students and its results will additionally be reported.

5N/4

Fit for purpose: TBL use in undergraduate (medicine), diploma course and Master/PhD programs on Health Professions Education (HPE)

Valdes Roberto Bollela (Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirao Preto da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Internal Medicine, Rua Prof. Benedito Siqueira abreu 160., Avenida Bandeirantes 3900, Ribeirao Preto 14096410, Brazil)

Maria Helena Senger (Pontificia Universidade Catolica Sao Paulo, Internal Medicine, Sorocaba, Brazil) Eliana M Amaral (Universidade de Campinas, Obstetric and Gynecology, Campinas, Brazil)

Страницы:
1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  30  31  32  33  34  35  36  37  38  39  40  41  42  43  44  45  46  47  48  49  50  51  52  53  54  55  56  57  58  59  60  61  62  63  64  65  66  67  68  69  70  71  72  73  74  75  76  77  78  79  80  81  82  83  84  85  86  87  88  89  90  91  92  93  94  95  96  97  98  99  100  101  102  103  104  105  106  107  108  109  110  111  112  113  114  115  116  117  118  119  120  121  122  123  124  125  126  127  128  129  130  131  132  133  134  135  136  137  138  139  140 


Похожие статьи

Автор неизвестен - 13 самых важных уроков библии

Автор неизвестен - Беседы на книгу бытие

Автор неизвестен - Беседы на шестоднев

Автор неизвестен - Богословие

Автор неизвестен - Божественность христа