Автор неизвестен - Mededworld and amee 2013 conference connect - страница 61

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Ivan Krajnc (University of Maribor, Faculty of Medicine, Maribor, Slovenia)

Background: Much attention has been devoted in recent decades to achieve excellence in teaching in medicine. Now, AMEE has launched an incentive to recognise and award excellence of medical schools for three different areas. Stemming from our experiences as an ASPIRE pilot site, we will provide hands-on training in submission preparation for the student engagement area. The workshop intends to provide the unique opportunity to reflect on what would be evidence of excellence in different settings by having diverse international attendance. Intended outcomes: At the end of the workshop participants will be able to: 1) appreciate global and local context specificity of excellence, 2) implement different ideas on how to further student engagement in their own institutions, 3) understand and critique what convincing evidence is, 4) improve the quality of their ASPIRE submission.

Structure of workshop: Following introduction, we will have a short presentation of ASPIRE incentive. Then the small working groups (SWG) assignments will form the backbone of the workshop. According to the structure of the application form, we will have four cycles of SWG focused brainstorming assignments, followed by group presentations: on Section A, two criteria from the Section C as chosen by participants (the emphasis on supporting claims of excellence with convincing evidence), and on Section E - if time permits. Who should attend: The workshop is tailored for those who are interested in preparing submissions for ASPIRE certificate for excellence in student engagement at their school. Students are also very welcome to share their views of what is excellence in this area. Level: Introductory

ABSTRACT BOOK: SESSION 5 MONDAY 26 AUGUST: 1600-1730

5X Workshop: Roda Gigante group and State University of Rio de Janeiro: Creative tools to develop professionalism in formation of Health Care providers

Location: Room D, Holiday Inn

Felipe Fortes (Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Hospital Universitario Pedro Ernesto, Rua Uruguai, 524/701, Rio de Janeiro 20510-060, Brazil) Carlos Eduardo Garcia (Roda Gigante, Laboratorio Gigante, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil)

Cristiana Brasil (Roda Gigante, Laboratorio Gigante, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil)

Daniela Sobrino (Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Hospital Universitario Pedro Ernesto/CDA, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil)

Lia da Silveira (Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Hospital Universitario Pedro Ernesto, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil)

Flavia Reis (Roda Gigante, Laboratorio Gigante, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil)

Background: The teaching of professionalism is a global challenge. Clowns and health professionals exist from the relationship with the other. This relationship is driven by principles such as empathy, look, listen, be available to the other, emotion and creativity. The principles that enable the quality of this relationship can be exercised. We identify correlations between the goals of the learning games of Clown's work at wards and the skills valued in the training of health professionals. Intended outcomes: Share the creative power of this methodology - learning games of the clown's work - on the training of health professionals; Encourage recognition of creative resources as powerful strategy to amplify principles which are involved in the relationship with the other; Discuss with participants the use of sensitive experience as a resource for teaching and learning in the training of health professionals and finally coloring the boundaries of health and science education with creative art.

Structure of workshop: In this workshop we will share

the methodology of training of clowns through sensitive

experiences mediated by video, games, reflection from

practice, debriefing and systematization.

Who should attend: Students, health professionals and

educators.

5Z Posters: Clinical Teaching and

Communication Skills

Location: South Hall, PCC

5Z/1

Teaching Clinical Skills with Google® Communities

Araya Khaimook (Hatyai Medical Education Centre, Surgery, Hatyai Hospital, 182 Rattakarn Road, Hatyai 90110, Thailand)

Prapa Ratanachai (Hatyai Medical Education Centre, Hatyai, Thailand)

Rajin Arora (Ministry of Public Health, Bangkok, Thailand)

Background: Teaching clinical skills has always been challenging. Many modalities have been used in teaching methods. In non-patient cycle, students are familiar with boxes and models or even high fidelity simulator. We present our experience using the new Google® communities as a tool for helping students learn clinical skills.

Summary of work: The community named "Video for CPIRD Students" was created. The list of essential clinical skills was posted with video demonstration. Students at Hatyai Hospital were assigned to watch video before class. In the class teacher taught clinical skills in usual way. Students were interviewed after class about this method.

Summary of results: Most students showed enthusiasm in this tool. The advantages were that they can focus and prepare the skills beforehand and then used them for reviewing after class and before examination. Nevertheless, there were low responses in comment section. This might be due to awareness that they might be focused later in the class.

Conclusions: This new tool could help students to focus on critical points of clinical skills and help teachers save their teaching times. This tool is ready for recycle and reuse and has potential for development at all time. Take-home messages: With some preparation, this DIY video bank can facilitate teaching and learning clinical

skills.

5Z/2

Comparison of Ophthalmologic Skill Teaching Between Video clip and Teacher's Demonstration

Taweesak Chongwiriyanurak (Lampang Hospital, Ophthalmology, 280 Paholyothin Road, Muang 52000, Thailand)

Background: Learning from video clip is one of the most popular modalities in procedure instruction. The aim of this study was to evaluate learning outcome and satisfaction of medical students who learnt by watching video clip compared with teacher's demonstration. Summary of work: 20 of 5th year medical students were divided into 2 groups equally. The first group received "Pressure patching" instruction by watching video clip. The second group received the same

ABSTRACT BOOK: SESSION 5 MONDAY 26 AUGUST: 1600-1730

instruction by teacher's demonstration. The learning outcomes of each group were evaluated with OSCE score and satisfaction and compared by using t-test or fisher's exact test.

Summary of results: General information, such as age, sex and 4 years grade point average (GPA) of both groups were not different. The satisfaction score in teacher's demonstration group was significantly higher than the watching video clip group (95.0 ± 8.2 versus 81.5 ± 14.2, P = 0.018) while the average OSCE score of those two groups were not significantly different (97.6 ± 1.9 versus 96.4 ± 2.0, P = 0.181).

Conclusions: Watching video clip had the same learning outcome as the demonstration by teacher, but the students had more satisfaction in learning by teacher's demonstration than video clip.

Take-home messages: An education isn't how much you know. It's being able to differentiate between what you do know and what you don't.

5Z/3

Managing and developing a clinical skills lab in difficult times

Luis Patrao (Faculty of Health Sciences - University of Beira Interior, LaC - Clinical Skills Lab, Rua Infante D. Henrique, Covilha 6200-506, Portugal) Ricardo Tjeng (Faculty of Health Sciences - University of Beira Interior, LaC - Clinical Skills Lab, Covilha, Portugal) Pedro Lito (Faculty of Health Sciences - University of Beira Interior, LaC - Clinical Skills Lab, Covilha, Portugal) Edmundo Dias (Faculty of Health Sciences - University of Beira Interior, LaC - Clinical Skills Lab, Covilha, Portugal) Miguel Castelo-Branco (Faculty of Health Sciences -University of Beira Interior, LaC - Clinical Skills Lab, Covilha, Portugal)

Background: During recent years, our Clinical Skills Lab faced the need to adapt to the European financial crisis with budget cutting, along with more and more students entering the medical course.

Summary of work: Further development on medical education was needed, despite those issues, and, having in mind that resources are even more limited nowadays, strategies were created accordingly. Summary of results: This rather difficult to solve issue became the driving force that was missing; a consistent student-as-teachers program was developed, along with an approach to junior doctors from nearby health institutions and to former students. Conclusions: Motivation of all the actors involved in this project is the secret to success. Students see their work rewarded in a much more motivating way than grades. Junior doctors have the chance to participate in teaching activities and to get involved in research projects in medical education and other areas. Take-home messages: Students-as-teachers and junior doctors as teachers additional motivation can have an important role in today's budget limited medical education development process.

5Z/4

A national survey 2012 on clinical skills laboratory for clerkship in Japan

Kazunobu Ishikawa (Fukushima Medical University, Center for Medical Education and Career Development, 1 Hikarigaoka, Fukushima 960-1295, Japan) Akiko Sugawara (Fukushima Medical University, Center for Medical Education and Career Development, Fukushima, Japan)

Gen Kobayashi (Fukushima Medical University, Center for Medical Education and Career Development, Fukushima, Japan)

Nobuo Nara (Tokyo Medical and Dental University, CerMed, Tokyo, Japan)

Background: Since recent changes in medical care security policy have made clinical skills training difficult even in teaching hospitals, trainings utilizing suitable models and simulators are becoming essential to acquire clinical skills for medical students. Based on these, we performed a national survey on clinical skills laboratory for clerkship in Japan. Summary of work: A registered form questionnaire sheets were sent to all medical schools in Japan (n=80) in December, 2012. The response sheets were filled both by a medical teacher and by a staff responsible for skills laboratory. A 91% response rate (73/80) was obtained.

Summary of results: Sixty-nine schools (94.5%) have already installed clinical skills laboratory, however, there were huge disparities in floor space and availability among schools. Floor space varied from 24 to 2,250 (mean 224 m2). The number of annual facility use by medical students varied from less than a hundred to over ten thousand (mean 1,725) in school year 2011. Sixty-one schools (61%) had resident director in skills laboratory, which significantly promoted facility use (p<0.05). Simulators utilized in most universities (>90%) were simulators for veno-puncture, simulator for lung sounds, mannequins for BLS, simulator for heart sounds, surgical suture trainer, and AED trainer. Conclusions: These results suggest the possibility that there are considerable differences in simulation-based learning environment during clinical clerkship among schools.

Take-home messages: Although most medical schools in Japan have their own clinical skills laboratory, there seem indispensable differences in size, service and status of utilization.

5Z/5

Developing and moderating an international online veterinary clinical skills group

Emma Crowther (University of Bristol, School of Veterinary Sciences, Langford House, Langford, Bristol

BS40 5DU, United Kingdom)

Elisabeth Schaper (University of Veterinary Medicine Hannover, E-Learning Department, Hannover, Germany) Emma Read (University of Calgary, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Calgary, Canada)

ABSTRACT BOOK: SESSION 5 MONDAY 26 AUGUST: 1600-1730

Maire O'Reilly (University College Dublin, School of

Veterinary Sciences, Dublin, Ireland)

Nicki Coombes (Royal Veterinary College, Clinical Skills

Centre, London, United Kingdom)

Naomi Booth (University of Nottingham, School of

Veterinary Medicine and Science, Nottingham, United

Kingdom)

Background: Clinical skills laboratories (CSLs) have an increasingly important role in veterinary training. An international online group, 'Veterinary Clinical Skills & Simulation', was established in 2010 within the veterinary professional network NOVICE (Network Of Veterinary ICt in Education) to allow members to share ideas and best practice, and discuss challenges. Summary of work: The group has a moderator whose role has involved recruiting members, inviting responses from experts, and collating information in the wikis. Group activities have included discussions on 'Assessing clinical skills' and 'How to set up a skills lab', which received over 50 posts with advice regarding the stations to include and where to source materials and models. Blogs have included reports from events and conferences in Europe and North America. Wikis have been used to collate information (e.g. from the group's discussion threads, lists of veterinary schools with CSLs, useful journals and references), and in combination with shared files make a valuable information repository. Summary of results: The group has grown steadily to nearly 200 members from veterinary schools in over 20 countries. Benefits reported have included having somewhere to ask questions and receiving help quickly in a friendly and supportive community. Conclusions: The group facilitates international collaboration in a rapidly developing area of veterinary education. Being online negates barriers such as travelling and time differences; asynchronous communication tools allow convenient access to discussions, whilst the information repository is an easily accessible, dynamic resource for group members. Take-home messages: Online groups provide unique opportunities to collaborate, share best practice and raise educational standards around the world.

5Z/6

Medical Students' and Physicians' Attitudes toward Patients' Consent to Participate in Clinical Training

Parnaz Daneshpajouhnejad (Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan Medical Students' Research Center, Isfahan, Iran)

Athar Omid (Medical Education Research Center, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Medical Education Department, Isfahan 8149936531, Iran) Omid Pirhaji (Isfahan Medical Students' Research Center, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran)

Background: The responsibility of the medical training team and practice staff towards a patient referring to an academic medical center has not been fully clarified. Moreover, the attitude towards patients may vary

among different institutions. Thus in this article we have looked at current practice in one of Iran's Medical Universities and tried to elaborate and compare the attitude of medical teachers and students towards patients' consent to be involved in the education of medical students.

Summary of work: In this cross-sectional study, conducted in February-March 2012, we distributed self-administrated questionnaires among all the medical mentors, residents and some students of academic hospitals of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences. This researcher-made questionnaire consisted of some questions about demographic factors, and some concerning several dimensions of informed consent. Data were analyzed using independent t-tests and

ANOVA.

Summary of results: Ninety one medical students (51 females) and 61 members of medical training team (25 females) completed the questionnaires that were assigned to them. The overall average attitude score was 36.53 ± 5.89 out of 60, which was classified as fair. The average attitude score for medical students and mentors were not significantly different. Moreover, the average attitude score of female students was 38.33±5.38 which was classified as good, and was different from that of male students, significantly (P-value <0.05). By categorizing medical mentors into those with =5 years of managerial or educational experience and those below 5, a significant difference in average attitude score was also documented (35.8 ± 2.54 in =5 and 34.0 ± 2.9 in >5 group).

Conclusions: According to this study, the attitude of the medical team is far from what is expected. Thus, the need to provide both medical students and medical mentors with data on the importance of obtaining patients' consent to be involved in medical education is highlighted. The medical team should know that informing the patients not only does not interfere with medical education, but also helps improve the patients' behavior towards students, because they may feel pleased by taking part in the education which provides the society with future doctors.

5Z/7

How do patients feel when examined by medical students? A mix of ambiguities and satisfactions found in a Brazilian qualitative study

Alcir Escocia Dorigatti (Alcir Escocia Dorigatti, State University of Campinas - UNICAMP, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Departamento de Psicologia Medica e Psquiatria - Rua Tessalia Vieira de Camargo, 126 -Cidade Universitaria "Zeferino Vaz", Campinas - SP 13083-887, Brazil)

Eliel W. Faber (State University of Campinas - UNICAMP, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Campinas, Brazil) Celso Garcia Jr (Faculty of Medical Sciences - State University of Campinas - UNICAMP, Laboratory of Clinical-Qualitative Research - Department of Medical Psychology and Psychiatry, Campinas, Brazil) Egberto Ribeiro Turato (Faculty of Medical Sciences -State University of Campinas - UNICAMP, Laboratory of

ABSTRACT BOOK: SESSION 5 MONDAY 26 AUGUST: 1600-1730

Clinical-Qualitative Research - Department of Medical Psychology and Psychiatry, Campinas, Brazil)

Background: In the context of medical teaching, patients are asked to cooperate and submit to medical examination. After technique demonstration from the professor, the students repeat it. How do patients feel in this situation?

Summary of work: To discuss psychological meanings assigned to experiences of hospitalized patients during semiological-clinical we use the Clinical-qualitative study method conducted with an intentional sample of 10 patients from a teaching hospital; using in-depth semi-directed interviews; results interpreted under concepts of Medical Psychology.

Summary of results: (1) Patients have an ambiguous relationship regarding students who sometimes strengthen the doctor-patient relationship with the team, but sometimes deconstruct it. The presence of students is important due to the bond generated, but students often doubt how to conduct certain situations: "What will I do? He would have to talk to me, right?"; (2) Unlike common sense states, there are patients that assume a paternalistic relationship, maybe not so common due to their social status. The presence of the "young doctor" seems relevant: "I felt that the student was in a cold sweat"; (3) The social constructions differences of relations within a teaching hospital compared to other hospitals, since these patients also act as an educational agents. Sometimes they understand such dynamics: "It's good for me, better for them: they are learning!" And at other times they are not: "The hospital is not able to give you a direction in your life."

Conclusions: In order for students to become aware about the emotional background of patients, they will be able to understand that such action may also have a therapeutic effect as well as how early they can influence the well-being of the patients.

5Z/8

The importance of Physicians' skills - from the patient perspective

Sina Iqbal (Imperial College London, Medicine, London, United Kingdom)

Naila Siddiqui (Northwick Park Hospital, Obstetrics & Gynaecology, London, United Kingdom)

Background: Patient satisfaction is of utmost importance in today's health service. Doctors' communication skills are thought to be a vital factor in ensuring this is met. To gain patients' perspectives on this subject, we studied their opinions on their recent consultations and their perceptions of doctors' communication skills.

Summary of work: A questionnaire was distributed to patients at an Outpatients department in March 2013. Scale scoring (1-5), rankings and qualitative feedback was collected and analysed.

Summary of results: Of the 27 patients studied, 62.9% were satisfied with their most recent consultation.

Recurrent positive themes were doctors' manners and provision of advice. Suggestions for improvement focused on not rushing consultations. Some communication skills attained a higher rating of importance than technical skills e.g. clearly explaining information, allowing time to understand and ask questions, and allowing patients to speak about their symptoms.

Conclusions: Communication skills are key in attaining patient satisfaction. Where consultations worked well, this was due to the quality of information provided and the docto's manner. Lack of satisfaction was driven by insufficient time allowed for the consultation, indicating that meetings should not be rushed. Although technical skills were regarded as important, interestingly other communication skills superseded this attribute in terms of importance.

Take-home messages: Whilst demonstrating high standards of clinical competence, doctors should also regard communication skills alike. Further attention must be directed towards any discrepancies between patients' and doctors' perceptions of communication

skills.

5Z/9

A comparison of two teaching methods of interpreting chest radiographs by medical students: single-disease patterns vs mixed-disease patterns

Nantaka Kiranantawat (Kiranantawat Prince of Songkla University, Radiology, Songklanagarind Hospital, Hat Yai 90110, Thailand)

Jitpreedee Sungsiri (Prince of Songkla University, Radiology, Hat Yai, Thailand) Teeravut Tubtawee (Prince of Songkla University, Radiology, Hat Yai, Thailand)

Sarayut L. Geater (Prince of Songkla University, Internal

medicine, Hat Yai, Thailand)

Chutima Chitchang (Prince of Songkla University,

Radiology, Hat Yai, Thailand)

Wiwatana Tanomkiat (Prince of Songkla University,

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