Автор неизвестен - Mededworld and amee 2013 conference connect - страница 65

Страницы:
1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  30  31  32  33  34  35  36  37  38  39  40  41  42  43  44  45  46  47  48  49  50  51  52  53  54  55  56  57  58  59  60  61  62  63  64  65  66  67  68  69  70  71  72  73  74  75  76  77  78  79  80  81  82  83  84  85  86  87  88  89  90  91  92  93  94  95  96  97  98  99  100  101  102  103  104  105  106  107  108  109  110  111  112  113  114  115  116  117  118  119  120  121  122  123  124  125  126  127  128  129  130  131  132  133  134  135  136  137  138  139  140 

5BB/12

The impact of the economic downturn on Residents' external rotations: A four-year study in a Tertiary Centre in the Murcia Region of Spain

Jose Galcera-Tomas (Hospital Clinico Universitario

Virgen de la Arrixaca, Teaching Unit, Carretera

Cartagena s/n, Murcia 30120, Spain)

V Cabanas-Perianes (Hospital Clinico Universitario Virgen

de la Arrixaca, Teaching Unit, Murcia, Spain)

F Guzman-Aroca (Hospital Clinico Universitario Virgen de

la Arrixaca, Teaching Unit, Murcia, Spain)

ABSTRACT BOOK: SESSION 5 MONDAY 26 AUGUST: 1600-1730

C Botella-Martinez (Hospital Clinico Universitario Virgen

de la Arrixaca, Teaching Unit, Murcia)

E Monzo-Nunez (Hospital Clinico Universitario Virgen de

la Arrixaca, Teaching Unit, Murcia, Spain)

J Gonzalez-Gimenez (Hospital Clinico Universitario Virgen

de la Arrixaca, Teaching Unit, Murcia)

Background: Optional paid external rotations (ERs) have long been considered a very important element of the Residents' Training Program, giving the trainee an opportunity to enhance his/her knowledge and skills (technical and other) and providing him/her with a wider educational and training perspective Summary of work: Given the impact of the economic downturn on healthcare budgets in general, we wished to investigate its specific effect on ERs in a Tertiary Centre in South-eastern Spain.

Summary of results: A total of 391 ERs were approved during the four year study period with an overall 26% increase from 2009-2012. When analysed according to the destination hospital, the trend was either static (national) or it increased (regional and international). The average duration of ER, expressed in median and interquartile range [ICR], across the four year study period did not change significantly: 60 [30-78], 60 [30­61], 60 [31-61] and 50 [30-61], respectively. Conclusions: Surprisingly, despite the economic downturn, there has been no decrease in the frequency or duration of ERs during the past four years. Take-home messages: Maintaining external rotations during an economic crisis is highly encouraging given the importance of such external rotations during the Residents' Training Program.

5BB/13

Developing the high flying registrar - a qualitative evaluation of the Severn Deanery education scholar programme

Paul Main (Severn NHS Deanery, Primary Care, Bristol, United Kingdom)

(Presenter: Anthony Curtis, Severn NHS Deanery, Primary Care, Deanery House, Old Bristol Road, Hambrook, Bristol BS16 1GW, United Kingdom)

Background: The introduction of the Education Scholarship and Education Fellowship programmes in the Severn Deanery in 2008 was in response to an emergent need for a more formalised career structure for the most able GPSTs and specifically for identified education scholars to progress over time from a scholar to temporary and substantive TPD posts. Summary of work: Semi-structured interviews with all 15 education scholars on the value and acceptance of the scholar's scheme. All data transcribed and emergent themes extracted.

Summary of results: Findings showed unequivocal and universal support for the scheme. GPSTs have specific educational needs which need to be identified early on in their career and nurtured to bring out talents. A comprehensive induction programme, delivered at the start of the education scholar scheme, is crucial to

identifying educational pathways and opportunities for specific project work. The self-directed nature of the education scholar scheme suited scholars who were already self-motivated and autonomous practitioners. Future opportunities for specific marketing roles to promote the education scholar scheme, targeted at recruiting future scholars, should be explored using scholars who were considered 'education influentials'. The importance of high quality mentoring is essential for the success of the education scholar scheme. Finally, scholars experiences of the scheme resulted in short term intentions in progressing to a TPD role and a 're­affirmation' of their future long term education career plans.

Conclusions: Future educational benefits of similar schemes need to be explored in other Deaneries nationally; Early identification of GPST 'education influentials' to nurture talent within and across Deaneries.

Take-home messages: The GP Education Scholar Scheme is valued and accepted amongst all GPSTs who have participated in the scheme. GPSTs have specific educational needs which need to be identified early on in their career and nurtured to bring out talents.

5BB/14

A Comprehensive Graduate Medical Education Program Established Through Cooperation Among Seven Medical Schools and Affiliated Hospitals in Japan

Michito Hirakata (Keio University School of Medicine, Medical Education Center, 35 Shinanomachi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582, Japan)

Toshiaki Monkawa (Keio University School of Medicine,

Medical Education Center, Tokyo, Japan)

Keisuke Kohyama (Keio University School of Medicine,

Clinical Research Center, Tokyo, Japan)

Takayuki Mitsuhashi (Keio University School of Medicine,

Department of Pediatrics, Tokyo, Japan)

Hiroyuki Yamagish (Keio University School of Medicine,

Department of Pediatrics, Tokyo, Japan)

Keiichi Fukuda (Keio University School of Medicine,

Department of Internal Medicine, Tokyo, Japan)

Background: It is essential to establish and maintain a high quality program for graduate medical education (GME) in developing residents and fellows with skill, knowledge, and professionalism. In addition, insufficient numbers of doctors in certain regions and skewed distribution of doctors in clinical specialties has recently become a significant social problem that needs to be addressed urgently in Japan.

Summary of work: To resolve this problem, we have developed an innovative GME program as a cooperation project with seven medical schools (Keio, Tokai, Saitama, Kyorin, Iwate, Toyama, and Tokyo Dental College) and their affiliated hospitals since 2009. We have built (1) 135 flexible training courses, including an exchange program between medical schools and affiliated hospitals, (2) a web-based registration and assessment system for trainees, (3) an internet

ABSTRACT BOOK: SESSION 5 MONDAY 26 AUGUST: 1600-1730

conference and seminar system among these hospitals, (4) workshops in clinical simulation and anatomy laboratories to enhance clinical skills, and (5) a symposium and seminars to teach medical ethics and professionalism in collaboration. Summary of results: We have established a wide range of courses designed to secure a high level of skill, knowledge, and professionalism through a tight network and cooperation among seven medical schools. The web-based program systems improved a regional gap in obtaining the most up-to-date medical knowledge and information.

Conclusions: The residents and fellows have been highly motivated and efficiently educated to become medical experts through their participation in this GME program.

5BB/15

The comparison for two postgraduate general medical training programs: a multi-center, prospective cohort study in Taiwan

Yen-Yuan Chen (National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Social Medicine, No 1, Rd. Ren-Ai sec. 1, Chong-Cheng District, Taipei 100, Taiwan) Tzong-Shinn Chu (National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Primary Care Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan) Chau-Chong Wu (National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Primary Care Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan) Yen-Hsuan Ni (National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Pediatrics, Taipei, Taiwan) Tien-Shang Huang (National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Social Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan) Pan-Chyr Yang (National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Internal Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan)

Background: Postgraduate general medical training (PGMT) has attracted attention since 2003 in Taiwan. From 2011 to 2012, Taiwan had two mandatory PGMT programs. In Program A, medical graduates, not affiliated to any specialty department, received 12-month PGMT rotating in various specialties. In Program B, medical graduates, already affiliated to a specialty department, received 6-month PGMT, with 3-month training in their specialty.

Summary of work: Five hospitals participated in this study. Four assessment tools, i.e. Mini-CEX, CbD, DOPS and MCQ, were used to assess each resident's clinical performance (Comprehensive Assessment for Clinical Performance, CAP). Mini-CEX, CbD and DOPS were translated to traditional Chinese with some modifications. All first-year residents took MCQ before starting the PGMT, and took MCQ after completing the PGMT. Only the first and the last assessment of Mini-CEX, CbD and DOPS were included for analysis. All the pre-test, post-test and the interval between the pre-test and the post-test of the four assessment tools, gender and age were included for building a singular value decomposition (SVD) model. Each resident, based on the SVD model, had a CAP score reflecting their overall clinical performance. Student t test then was used to compare the CAP scores between the two groups.

Summary of results: The CAP score for Program A was significantly higher than that for Program B (p<0.0001). Conclusions: Medical graduates receiving 12-month PGMT by rotating in various specialties did better in general medicine than those receiving 6-month PGMT, with 3-month mandatory training in their specialty. Take-home messages: Postgraduate general medical training rotating in various specialties has better clinical performance than that only rotating in a single specialty.

5BB/16

A Multi-Faceted Model to Achieve Competency in Practice Based Learning in Graduate Medical Education

DanielDressler (Emory University, Internal Medicine, 1365 Clifton Road, NE, Clinic A Building, Room A4306,

Atlanta, GA 30322, United States)

Amy Allison (Emory University, Woodruff Health Sciences Center Library, Atlanta, United States) Anna Getselman (Columbia University, Medical Library, New York, United States)

Dustin Smith (Emory University, Internal Medicine, Atlanta, United States)

Bhavin Adhyaru (Emory University, Internal Medicine, Atlanta, United States)

Lorenzo Di Francesco (Emory University, Internal Medicine, Atlanta, United States)

Background: Competency in practice-based learning (PBL) requires deliberately and rigorously questioning current practice, locating and accurately interpreting relevant literature and incorporating evidence into clinical decision-making.

Summary of work: We develop our internal medicine residents to attain PBL knowledge, skills and behaviors for successful lifelong learning through a multi-step, layered curriculum in evidence based medicine (EBM) spanning the 3-year residency training. Summary of results: Our EBM curriculum includes intern-year pre- and post-assessments of online searching, with structured feedback. Interns participate in interactive didactic instruction and actively supervised literature critical appraisal. Post-assessment confirmed that online searching skills have significantly improved from pre-intern year to post-intern year. Each junior-level resident receives mentorship to individually prepare and facilitate a journal club workshop among peers, students and faculty. Senior residents prepare a one-hour grand rounds style presentation utilizing EBM skills to incorporate key clinical evidence to answer focused clinical question(s). Other PBL activities span the course of residency training, including multiple-per-week interactive and interdisciplinary resident reports where clinical questions lead to evidence sought and reported back through a resident report blog. Resident-led journal clubs reinforce literature interpretation skills. Conclusions: Our multi-tiered model permits graduate trainees to attain competency in PBL through online assessments, formal instruction and facilitated learning and teaching. Incorporating active learning methods throughout the curriculum has supported objective

ABSTRACT BOOK: SESSION 5 MONDAY 26 AUGUST: 1600-1730

improvement in resident searching skills. Our curriculum deserves further development in assessment of literature interpretation skills. Take-home messages: A structured, multifaceted EBM curriculum intercalated within a graduate medical education program actively develops knowledge, skills and attitudes that support career-long practice based learning.

5BB/17

Relationship between knowledge and skill of Basic Life Support based on AHA2010 in Interns of Kashan University of Medical Sciences - 2012

Parastoo Pournaghshband (Kashan University of Medical Sciences, Research Center, Ghotb-E Ravandi Blv., Kashan 8715985131, Iran)

Fakhrosadat Mirhoseini (Tehran University of Medical Sciences and Kashan University of Medical Sciences, Medical Education In Tehran and Anesthesia in Kashan, Iran)

Fariba Raygan (Kashan University of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular Dep., Kashan, Iran) Zeynab Ahmadikia (Kashan University of Medical Sciences, Research Center, Kashan, Iran) Hamidreza Seyedi (Kashan University of Medical Sciences, Anesthesia Dep., Kashan, Iran) Mohammad Sobahi Bidgoli (Kashan University of Medical Sciences, Public Health Dep., Kashan, Iran)

Background: The studies showed the survival rate after sudden cardiac arrest depending on the initial cardiac rhythm and early recovery is different from 2 to 49%. BLS is important to the extent that if not starting CPR, the victim's chance of survival decreases from 7 to 10 percent for every one-minute delay. Interns are critically important during a CPR process, so the relationship between their knowledge and skill of Basic Life Support studied.

Summary of work: A cross-sectional study was conducted with all 69 interns of medical faculty in Kashan using a knowledge questionnaire and checklists of chest compression, opening airway, mouth to mouth breathing designed based on AHA2010 CPR protocol and confirmed by 10 experts. The test was done on 2 programmable simulation manikins in clinical skill center.

Summary of results: The mean of interns' chest compression, opening airway and mouth to mouth breathing scores respectively were 8.94±3.73, 10.04±5.21, and 6.92± 4.84. The knowledge score of BLS was 9.56±2.17 and the Pearson correlation between knowledge and skill was significant. Conclusions: Practical education in BLS needs to be emphasized.

Take-home messages: Practical education in BLS needs to be emphasized.

5BB/18

"Growing your own": developing a dedicated, educated health workforce

Tyler Warburton (University Hospital South Manchester, UHSM Academy, Manchester, United Kingdom) Suzanne Vaughan (University of Manchester, School of Medicine, Manchester, United Kingdom) Paul Barber (University Hospital South Manchester, UHSM Academy, ATR4, Education and Research Centre, Wythenshawe Hospital, Manchester M23 9LT, United Kingdom)

Hilary Whyatt (University Hospital South Manchester, UHSM Academy, Manchester, United Kingdom)

Background: Workforce modernisation is a key strategy to ensure that patients receive the right care, by the right people, in the right place. The North West of England is leading the way in pioneering a Healthcare Apprenticeship scheme and developing Assistant Practitioners to address this need. Summary of work: We report on the collaboration between educators one UK hospital and describe how emerging communities of practice are impacting on learning environments, trainees, workplaces and patient care. Together the teams support over 130 apprentices and 450 trainee Assistant Practitioners. Summary of results: Although staff on the two schemes shared many similar objectives and challenges, the teams did not initially work together. As a relationship between the teams formed, resources were built and shared, resulting in a better experience for trainees and other stakeholders. Aware of each others' practices they became brokers and champions across multiple workplaces, supporting managers, mentors and strategic development of the roles. Facilitating communities of practice in other areas will be discussed along with the broader implications for workforce development, interprofessional working, distributed teams and social mobility.

Conclusions: Developing communities of practice around the training of pre-registration staff successfully improves the experience and expertise of educators and trainees alike, without investing more financial capital. This has implications for healthcare systems in times of decreasing resources.

Take-home messages: Lessons can be learned from education and training initiatives beyond medicine.

5CC Posters: eLearning

Location: South Hall, PCC

5CC/1

Developing a self-directed e-learning package to enhance radiological interpretation in medical students

Ali Salajegheh (Griffith University, Medicine, Gold Coast, Australia)

Ian Kerr (Griffith University, Medicine, Centre for Medicine and Oral Health, 16-30 High Street, Southport, Gold Coast 4215, Australia)

Sahar Pakneshan (Griffith University, Medicine, Gold Coast, Australia)

Elliot Dolan-Evans (Griffith University, Medicine, Gold Coast, Australia)

Gary Rogers (Griffith University, Medicine, Gold Coast, Australia)

Background: The ability to interpret an X-Ray is a vital skill for graduating medical students which guides clinicians towards accurate diagnosis and treatment of the patient. However, research has suggested that radiological interpretation skills are less than satisfactory in not only medical students, but also in residents and consultants. Summary of work: This study investigated the effectiveness of e-learning for the development of X-ray interpretation skills in pre-clinical medical students. Competencies in clinical X-Ray interpretation were assessed by comparison of pre- and post-intervention scores, where the e-learning course was the 'intervention'.

Summary of results: Our results demonstrate improved knowledge and skills in X-ray interpretation in students. Assessment of the post training Year 1 students showed significantly higher scores than the scores of Year 2 students undertaking the same assessment at the same time.

Conclusions: The development of online simulation education allows students to perfect their skills and allows them to learn the information at their own pace. The teaching of radiology lends itself particularly well to implementation on a computer-based format due to the highly visual nature of the content. The development of the Internet and advances in multimedia technologies has paved the way for computer-assisted education. As more rural clinical schools are established the electronic delivery of radiology teaching through websites will become a necessity.

Take-home messages: The use of e-learning to deliver radiology tuition to medical students represents an exciting alternative and is an effective method of developing competency in radiological interpretation for medical students.

ABSTRACT BOOK: SESSION 5 MONDAY 26 AUGUST: 1600-1730

5CC/2

Canine 3D Software in Veterinary Medicine Education: a new approximation in using diagnostic medical images for Anatomy teaching for undergraduate students

Rodolfo Paredes (Universidad Andres Bello, Escuela de Medicina Veterinaria, Facultad de Ecologia y Recursos Naturales, Republica 440, Segundo piso, Santiago 5602,

Chile)

Cintya Borroni (Universidad Andres Bello, Escuela de Medicina Veterinaria, Facultad de Ecologia y Recursos Naturales, Santiago, Chile)

Diana Bermejo (Universidad Andres Bello, Escuela de Medicina Veterinaria, Facultad de Ecologia y Recursos Naturales, Santiago, Chile)

Nora Chovan (Universidad Andres Bello, Escuela de Medicina Veterinaria, Facultad de Ecologia y Recursos Naturales, Santiago, Chile)

Carlos Gonzalez (Universidad Andres Bello, Escuela de Medicina Veterinaria, Facultad de Ecologia y Recursos Naturales, Santiago, Chile)

Eduardo Landerer (Universidad Andres Bello, Escuela de Medicina, Facultad de Medicina, Santiago, Chile)

Background: The canine 3D software development arises in the context of implementing NTICs in teaching and learning processes. Here, we have designed a multimedia educational material that will facilitate the understanding, analysis and application of anatomy in all courses in Veterinary Medicine where it is required. Summary of work: The Canine 3D program was developed with the purpose of facilitating the study of the dog body systems by using pictures and videos of anatomical and clinical-surgical procedures such as radiology, dissection, Endoscopy, Laparoscopy and ultrasonography to recognize interactively and with a clinical approach, the anatomic relationships of anatomical components and systems. The implementation of this program will support the teaching, collaborative and individual learning, creativity and research, leading to stimulation of the exploration and development of different processes and applications that make solving relevant problems more efficient.

Summary of results: The software consists of systems, clinical tools and active zones that have a 3D graphical interface with interactive layers of different systems including osteoarticular, muscular, cardiovascular, respiratory, urinary, female and male reproduction. The program operates in Windows, Apple and Android systems.

Conclusions: It was possible to develop a new 3D multimedia educational material that will be used as a reinforcement of classroom lecturing, and that will help in the process of active and autonomous non-attendance teaching and learning, thus promoting a more active role of the undergraduate student in their own learning process. Grant from FIAC UAB1102

5CC/3

The teaching methodology accent shift from "what to learn" to "how to get and arrange that for learning"

Nataliya Pronina (State Institution "Crimea State Medical University named after S.I. Georgievsky", Medical Physics and Informatics, 5/7 Lenin Boulevard, Simferopol 95006, Ukraine)

Background: The number and diversity of Internet resources transform undergraduate student tutors from information carriers into supervisors orientating students into information wide streams. Tutors can develop students' ability to choose and link correct information fragments properly via solving practical problems.

Summary of work: Two types of assignments on "Medical and Biological Physics" were created for two groups of 20 students each. Separate task sets training students in theories applications were of the first type. The second one was of practical problems form. Each problem covered several discipline themes. To solve problems students should go the continuous way. To support their steps the tutor compiled theoretical materials also serving the students as examples of proper information choice and linkage information for solving complex problems.

Summary of results: 36 separate assignments required to complete "Medical and Biological Physics" were interpreted as 9 complex practical problems. These problems were installed at the University website through developed computer testing program providing the feedback for submission with a variety of forms as analytical derivations, numerical estimations, graphical presentations, statistical processing, etc. After the first two months' study the problem orientated group shown 20% lower results than traditionally taught students. After the next three months the first group has shown 35% higher level on average.

Conclusions: Complex practical problems as forms of assignments develop students' methodology of analysis and link Internet resources into logical chains. Take-home messages: To navigate students across the information oceans is now the tutors' main task.

5CC/4

Developing dialogic e-learning for osteopathic professionalism

Marcus Dye (General Osteopathic Council, Professional Standards, Osteopathy House, 176 Tower Bridge Road, London SE1 3LU, United Kingdom) Priya Lakhani (General Osteopathic Council, Regulation, London, United Kingdom)

Kellie Green (General Osteopathic Council, Regulation,

London, United Kingdom)

Alan Stewart (I.T. Consultant, Anstruther, United

Kingdom)

Fiona Browne (General Osteopathic Council, Professional Standards, London, United Kingdom)

ABSTRACT BOOK: SESSION 5 MONDAY 26 AUGUST: 1600-1730

Sue Roff (Education Consultant, Cellardyke, United Kingdom)

Страницы:
1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  30  31  32  33  34  35  36  37  38  39  40  41  42  43  44  45  46  47  48  49  50  51  52  53  54  55  56  57  58  59  60  61  62  63  64  65  66  67  68  69  70  71  72  73  74  75  76  77  78  79  80  81  82  83  84  85  86  87  88  89  90  91  92  93  94  95  96  97  98  99  100  101  102  103  104  105  106  107  108  109  110  111  112  113  114  115  116  117  118  119  120  121  122  123  124  125  126  127  128  129  130  131  132  133  134  135  136  137  138  139  140 


Похожие статьи

Автор неизвестен - 13 самых важных уроков библии

Автор неизвестен - Беседы на книгу бытие

Автор неизвестен - Беседы на шестоднев

Автор неизвестен - Богословие

Автор неизвестен - Божественность христа